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Buffeted by Political Winds

Children’s Literature in Communist Romania

Adrian Solomon

Romanian children’s literature may be as rich as any other, but critics and historians have only focused on its pre-Communist period. Although after the fall of Communism and the revival of free speech the reevaluation of recent history based on

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Reframing Disability through Graphic Novels for Girls

Alternative Bodies in Cece Bell’s El Deafo

Wendy Smith-D’Arezzo and Janine Holc

All Handicapped Children Act of 1978 mandated inclusion, children’s literature authors have increased their inclusion of disabled characters and experiences, in parallel with other projects aimed at adding diversity to the curriculum. Disabled

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Heroes of Our Time

The Historical-Political Context of Devorah Omer’s Novels

Rima Shikhmanter

suggestion of Uriel Ofek, a prominent editor and translator of children’s literature who, in the 1960s, began to explore the possibility of publishing a new series of books on leading Zionist figures. This series, which had yet to gain traction, was to be

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Sami Schalk

of sustained narratives about disabled characters positions girls with disabilities outside of the scripted and shared narratives of the main American Girl characters. Conclusion: Ablenationalism for Girls Research in children’s literature and

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Sarah E. Whitney

, received widespread acclaim. To date, Dias’s project has resulted in the worldwide distribution of over 9,000 volumes of children’s literature. 1 Marley Dias’s activism exemplifies Black Girl Magic, a mediated discourse affirming African-American girls

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Girl, Interrupted and Continued

Rethinking the Influence of Elena Fortún’s Celia

Ana Puchau de Lecea

’ power in the 1920s and seek to discuss how she, as a literary figure, served as a precursor to authors of the 1950s in Spain. In the first section I consider the creation and impact of Celia as an alternative character in children’s literature in the

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Andrea Mei-Ying Wu and Jay Mechling

Boys in children’s literature and popular culture: Masculinity, abjection, and the fictional child by Annette Wannamaker. New York: Routledge Falmer, 2007, 200 pp.

We Boys Together: Teenagers in Love before Girl-Craziness by Jeffrey P. Dennis. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2007, x + 283 pp.

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Jonathan Magonet

This issue is largely given over to the proceedings of a conference on ‘Jewishness, Literature and the Child’ organized by the Institute of Jewish Studies at the University of Antwerp (12–14 December 2007). Edited and introduced by Katrien Vloeberghs, the papers explore the various ways in which issues surrounding the Holocaust find direct and indirect expression in Jewish children’s literature.

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“Like Alice, I was Brave”

The Girl in the Text in Olemaun’s Residential School Narratives

Roxanne Harde

ABSTRACT

In the genre of residential school narratives for children, Not My Girl (2014) stands out for the determination, courage, and resilience of its narrator, a young girl who chooses to go to a Catholic boarding school, and then draws on both her culture and a British novel, Alice in Wonderland, about a brave girl for strength and resilience. This article traces Olemaun’s journey as she follows Alice into literacy but finds her own methods of resisting colonial oppression and asserting Indigenous agency.

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"Warn the Duke"

The Sarajevo Assassination in History, Memory, and Myth

Paul Miller-Melamed

How has the Sarajevo assassination been conjured and construed, narrated and represented, in a wide variety of media including fiction, film, newspapers, children’s literature, encyclopedias, textbooks, and academic writing itself? In what ways have these sources shaped our understanding of the so-called “first shots of the First World War”? By treating the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (28 June 1914) as a "site of memory" à la historian Pierre Nora, this article argues that both popular representations and historical narratives (including academic writing) of the political murder have contributed equally to the creation of what I identify here as the “Sarajevo myth.”