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Buffeted by Political Winds

Children’s Literature in Communist Romania

Adrian Solomon

Romanian children’s literature may be as rich as any other, but critics and historians have only focused on its pre-Communist period. Although after the fall of Communism and the revival of free speech the reevaluation of recent history based on

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Andrea Mei-Ying Wu and Jay Mechling

Boys in children’s literature and popular culture: Masculinity, abjection, and the fictional child by Annette Wannamaker. New York: Routledge Falmer, 2007, 200 pp.

We Boys Together: Teenagers in Love before Girl-Craziness by Jeffrey P. Dennis. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2007, x + 283 pp.

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Jonathan Magonet

This issue is largely given over to the proceedings of a conference on ‘Jewishness, Literature and the Child’ organized by the Institute of Jewish Studies at the University of Antwerp (12–14 December 2007). Edited and introduced by Katrien Vloeberghs, the papers explore the various ways in which issues surrounding the Holocaust find direct and indirect expression in Jewish children’s literature.

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"Warn the Duke"

The Sarajevo Assassination in History, Memory, and Myth

Paul Miller-Melamed

How has the Sarajevo assassination been conjured and construed, narrated and represented, in a wide variety of media including fiction, film, newspapers, children’s literature, encyclopedias, textbooks, and academic writing itself? In what ways have these sources shaped our understanding of the so-called “first shots of the First World War”? By treating the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (28 June 1914) as a "site of memory" à la historian Pierre Nora, this article argues that both popular representations and historical narratives (including academic writing) of the political murder have contributed equally to the creation of what I identify here as the “Sarajevo myth.”

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Katherine Scheil

According to actor Nick Asbury, Stratford-upon-Avon is ‘a wonderful, strange, old place … a place of dreams’. As the site of literary pilgrimage since the eighteenth century, the home of the Royal Shakespeare Company and the topic of hundreds of imaginary portrayals, Stratford is ripe for analysis, both in terms of its factual existence and its fictional afterlife. The essays in this special issue of Critical Survey consider the various manifestations of the physical and metaphorical town on the Avon, across time, genre and place, from America to New Zealand, from children’s literature to wartime commemorations. We meet many Stratfords in this collection, real and imaginary, and the interplay between the two generates new visions of the place. The essays in this collection, summarised in Nicola Watson’s afterword, begin to write a history of these imagined Stratfords.

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The Miserable, Mythical, Magical Marmiton

Representing Culinary Apprenticeship in Early Third Republic France

Michael D. Garval

Revealing paradoxes abounded in early Third Republic French representations of the marmiton, or culinary apprentice. Investigative reportage and reformist discourse exposed apprentices’ miserable existence while still depicting these young fellows as playful and carefree. Conversely, popular marmiton mythology, particularly in children’s literature, idealized culinary apprenticeship, amid glimpses of harsh living and working conditions, while also highlighting admittedly rare opportunities for ambitious apprentices to achieve substantial public success. Max Jacob’s children’s book Histoire du Roi Kaboul Ier et du Marmiton Gauwain provides an emblematic example with its parodic fairy-tale rendering of celebrity chef Auguste Escoffier’s extraordinary triumphs. Ultimately, while enchanting, the rosy popular vision of the magical marmiton obfuscated exploitative child labor practices underpinning the whole culinary enterprise in this supposed golden age of French gastronomy.

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Reframing Disability through Graphic Novels for Girls

Alternative Bodies in Cece Bell’s El Deafo

Wendy Smith-D’Arezzo and Janine Holc

All Handicapped Children Act of 1978 mandated inclusion, children’s literature authors have increased their inclusion of disabled characters and experiences, in parallel with other projects aimed at adding diversity to the curriculum. Disabled

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Christopher Pittard

Andrew, Lucy. 2017. The Boy Detective in Early British Children’s Literature: Patrolling the Borders Between Boyhood and Manhood . Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. ix + 243 pp. $109.99. ISBN 978-3-319-62089-3 (hardback); ISBN 978

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Heroes of Our Time

The Historical-Political Context of Devorah Omer’s Novels

Rima Shikhmanter

suggestion of Uriel Ofek, a prominent editor and translator of children’s literature who, in the 1960s, began to explore the possibility of publishing a new series of books on leading Zionist figures. This series, which had yet to gain traction, was to be

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Diederik F. Janssen

’s Modern Return . New York : Garland . Richmond , Velma Bourgeois . 2014 . Chivalric Stories as Children’s Literature: Edwardian Retellings in Words and Pictures . Jefferson, NC : McFarland .