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Jesús Tronch

The Spanish Civil War broke out on 18 July 1936, when reactionary factions of the army rebelled against the young progressive Second Republic, then governed by a broad left-wing coalition. 1 Spain and the Spaniards were split between those loyal to

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Bringing Lebanon’s Civil War Home to Anglophone Literature

Alameddine’s Appropriation of Shakespeare’s Tragedies

Yousef Awad

Introduction Ripped apart by civil war and continual political and military interventions by regional and international powers, Lebanon is an ‘unstated state [… that] has no strength and no authority’, as literary scholar Salah D. Hassan laments

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Maureen Mulligan

The aim of this article is to consider the degree of responsibility involved in the travels and writing of two women who wrote about Spain during the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939). This complex and devastating event broke out when the

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Blurred memories

War and disaster in a Buddhist Sinhala village

Mara Benadusi

,000 deaths, while official governmental sources later fixed the number at 31,000. This is nearly a third of the number of causalities produced by the almost 26 years of the Sri Lankan Civil War, using the officially reported number of 85,000 deaths between

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War and Memory

The Israeli Communist Commemoration of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1986

Amir Locker-Biletzki

The Spanish Civil War, which began on 19 July 1936, quickly became the rallying point for leftists around the globe, who flocked to defend the Spanish Republic. During those same years, the rise of extreme right-wing ideologies in Central and

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Dina A. Amanzholova

This article examines the movement for the achievement of national and regional autonomy for the indigenous peoples of Siberia. Concentrating on East Siberia, the author discusses the various conflicts between advocates of autonomy - political, territorial and cultural - in the region, and the various warring factions during the Revolution, Civil War and the early 1920s. She demonstrates how the native peoples did not necessarily understand the political ambitions of the leaders and politicians. She also demonstrates how difficult it was for the general principle of national self-determination to be achieved with so many conflicting interests during a period of nation-wide upheaval and civil war. Underlying this were also the perennial contradictions between the political aims of the centre and the local interests of the outlying regions and peoples. In conclusion, the author suggests that many of the problems of Siberian autonomous movements in the early twentieth century re-appeared at its end.

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“Eyes Shut, Muted Voices”

Narrating and Temporalizing the Post–Civil War Era through a Monument

Dimitra Gefou-Madianou

second critical event, enfolded in the first one: the torching of the village by the Nazis and the ensuing civil war. My interest in this issue was triggered by the raising of a monument in memory of the ‘holocaust’ or ‘tragedy of 1944’, referred to by

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Becoming Communist

Ideals, Dreams, and Nightmares

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

, International Communism and the Spanish Civil War: Solidarity and Suspicion , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, xiii, 278 pp., $29.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-131-622690-2. Both these books are important for their emphasis on the quotidian in two

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History Teaching and Cultural Hegemony

Representations of the Spanish Civil War in Francoist History Textbooks of the 1960s

Johanna Fricke

“The Supreme Court Stops Franco's Exhumation” El País , 5 June 2019 Even though 1 April 2019 marked the eightieth anniversary of the end of the Spanish Civil War, the conflict remains a divisive issue in Spanish society today.1 As the above

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Broken Tongues

Race, Sacrifice, and Geopolitics in the Far East in Vsevolod Ivanov’s Bronepoezd No. 14-69

Roy Chan

Vsevolod Ivanov's 1922 Bronepoezd No. 14-69 spawned subsequent renditions in Russian and Chinese. The novella narrates the successful effort of a group of Red partisans in seizing an armored train delivering reinforcements in order to quell a rebellion in a Far Eastern town. This article examines the story's Chinaman (kitaets) Sin-Bin-U, a Red volunteer motivated by a desire to avenge himself against the Japanese. The most prominent marker of Sin-Bin-U's Chineseness is his tortured Russian, rendered nearly incomprehensible by his accent. Focusing on Sin-Bin-U's figuration, this article argues that Ivanov's tale and its subsequent incarnations in Russian and Chinese create a literary evocation of the complexities of linguistic hybridity, cultural contestation, and sovereign crisis in the Far East. Sin-Bin-U is thus interpreted as a paradoxical persona who oscillates between being an allegorical figuration of an internationalized Soviet subjectivity and a token of imperialist strife and victimization.