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Clothing and Colours in Early Islam

Adornment (Aesthetics), Symbolism and Differentiation

Hadas Hirsch

Historians of clothing and adornment base their research on two kinds of sources: actual garments or other material remains such as paintings, sculptures and book drawings, and written sources ( Berward 1995 ), which serve as the core of the

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Citizenship in religious clothing?

Navayana Buddhism and Dalit emancipation in late 1990s Uttar Pradesh

Nicolas Jaoul

disillusion but not the only one. 3 It also interestingly echoes Ambedkar’s own disappointment with institutional politics half a century before. Citizenship in religious clothing? In his pioneering work on the Ambedkarite movement of Agra (UP), the

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Women “Making History” in Museums

The Case of Female Curators in Postwar New Zealand

Bronwyn Labrum

This article examines three remarkable New Zealand women, Nancy Adams, Rose Reynolds, and Edna Stephenson, who, as honorary or part-time staff, each began the systematic collecting and display of colonial history at museums in Wellington, Christchurch, and Auckland in the 1950s. Noting how little research has been published on women workers in museums, let alone women history curators, it offers an important correction to the usual story of the heroic, scientific endeavors of male museum directors and managers. Focusing largely on female interests in everyday domestic life, textiles, and clothing, their activities conformed to contemporary gendered norms and mirrored women’s contemporary household role with its emphasis on housekeeping, domestic interiors, and shopping and clothing. This article lays bare the often ad hoc process of “making history” in these museums, and adds complexity and a greater fluidity to the interpretations we have to date of women workers in postwar museums.

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Gold Teeth, Indian Dresses, Chinese Lycra and ‘Russian’ Hair

Embodied Diplomacy and the Assemblages of Dress in Tajikistan

Diana Ibañez-Tirado

supplements decreed by Tajikistan’s government; and dress style, the fashions that people incorporate to their everyday apparel. Fashion, as Heath (1992) suggests, entails the displacement of out-of-style items of clothing for those that are constructed as

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The White Cotton Robe

Charisma and Clothes in Tibetan Buddhism Today

Magdalena Maria Turek

vestimentary practices and religious charisma has not been thoroughly examined. Works that analyze the theme of the clothing of charismatics have focused on contexts that are either political ( Gonsalves 2010 ; Perinbanayagam 1971 ) or academic ( Clark 2006

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'Both in Men's Clothing'

Gender, Sovereignty and Insecurity in Richard Marsh's The Beetle

Victoria Margree

On its publication in 1897 Richard Marsh’s The Beetle was more popular than Dracula. However, in the latter part of the twentieth century its popularity with both readers and critics waned, and it is only now that Marsh’s story of the Egyptian beetle-creature seeking vengeance on a British politician is attracting renewed critical interest. It is not my intention here to take serious issue with any of these important and revealing critical discussions, which variously explore the novel in terms of fears over ‘reverse colonisation’; depictions of the ‘abhumanness’ of the female body; and cultural debates on the nature and significance of trance-states. Rather, I wish to open up discussion of the novel by identifying some of the important and peculiar features of this – admittedly very peculiar – novel, that have not so far received the attention they deserve. These thus-far critically neglected features include: the significance of the opening chapters’ emphases upon vagrancy and destitution; the novel’s exploration of ‘political authority’ and its ambivalence towards its central male character, the liberal politician; and the representation of the New Woman. More specifically I wish to investigate the historical and ideological motivations for what I consider to be the novel’s conflation of its New Woman character with the figure of the emasculated and vagrant clerk.

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Daniel Miller and Sophie Woodward

This paper considers the challenge to anthropology represented by a topic such as global denim. Using the phrase ‘blindingly obvious’, it considers the problems posed by objects that have become ubiquitous. While there are historical narratives about the origins, history and spread of denim, these leave open the issue of how we make compatible the ethnographic study of specific regional appropriations of denim and its global presence in a manner that is distinctly anthropological. Ethnographies of blue jeans in Brazil and England are provided as examples. These suggest the need to understand the relationship between three observations: its global presence, the phenomenon of distressing and its relationship to anxiety in the selection of clothes. As a manifesto, this paper argues for a global academic response that engages with denim from the global commodity chain through to the specificity of local accounts of denim wearing. Ultimately this can provide the basis for an anthropological engagement with global modernity.

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Shara Crookston and Monica Klonowski

are styled in exclusive, costly clothing brands. In an example of what Andi Zeisler refers to as “marketplace feminism,” Teen Vogue profits from superficial narratives of neoliberal, postfeminist ideals using this language of so-called empowerment

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Stanley Chojnacki

’ annual food and clothing expenses. 9 Clearly, income from dowries formed an essential component to the family’s annual maintenance. Another way the dowry reshaped a husband’s wealth was his obligation to place a lien on enough of it to ensure its return

Open access

Stiletto Socialism

Social Class, Dressing Up, and Women's Self-Positioning in Socialist Slovenia

Polona Sitar

women served as the domestic bearers of socialist modernization with the mission of transforming the rest of their family members into modern citizens. 3 Clothing was one of the areas in which the identity and loyalty of citizens toward the state were