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Every Campus A Refuge

A Small College’s Engagement with Refugee Resettlement

Diya Abdo and Krista Craven

response to that call, after we asked ourselves a simple question: why can’t a campus be like a parish and temporarily host refugees, assisting them in resettlement in the local area? Parishes (small cities or towns) and university and college campuses are

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Too Little, Too Late?

The Challenges of Providing Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare to Men on College Campuses

Lilian Milanés and Joanna Mishtal

as providers’ subjective understandings ( Fineman 1991 ) and providers’ own non-compliance, a particularly relevant consideration for addressing STIs in the college campus context. Social science and public health scholarship have identified a number

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Davydd J. Greenwood

Richard Arum and Josipa Roska (2011) Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 259 pp., 978-0-226-02855-2 (hbk).

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Heidi Ross and Yajing Chen

Vincent Tinto's theory of academic and social integration provides a framework for investigating perceived problems associated with Chinese international students' engagement at a public research-intensive university in the U.S. Midwest ('Midwest' University). These 'problems' – classroom silence, segregation and instrumentalism – are often understood in cultural terms, and we describe sociocultural values that might influence such behaviour. We also contend that culture, on its own, cannot wholly explain the complexity of student behaviours on college campuses. In a case study of Midwest University's Business School, we show how institutional policies do much to shape Chinese students' engagement. We conclude that popular perceptions of Chinese student engagement are simplistic. Chinese students are not indifferent engagers; rather, their interaction with campus life needs to be understood as embedded within complex cultural and institutional contexts.

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Introduction

Constructing and practising student engagement in changing institutional cultures

Lisa Garforth and Anselma Gallinat

learning practices and outcomes on U.S. college campuses, engendered intense debate in education studies, the popular media and beyond. Although the study’s methodological robustness and theoretical sophistication have been much discussed (for example

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“Because There Are Young Women Behind Me”

Learning from the Testimonios of Young Undocumented Women Advocates

Carolina Silva

organize regionally and locally ( Muñoz 2015 ). This materialized in local advocacy groups across the nation and on college campuses, as newly formed undocumented student groups. Here, I focus on the experiences of five undocumented college-aged women as

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Brent E. Sasley

For many scholars of Israel, the growth in Israel-related courses on college campuses and the emergence of a field of study devoted solely to the country, Israel Studies, have been welcome developments. 1 Yet this shift has underscored the long

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Making It Up

Intergenerational Activism and the Ethics of Empowering Girls

Emily Bent

marriage, slut shaming, breast ironing, 6 sexual assault and harassment on college campuses, female genital cutting, and sexism in sports and in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). In her speech, she imagined “a world

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Mixed Message Media

Girls’ Voices and Civic Engagement in Student Journalism

Piotr S. Bobkowski and Genelle I. Belmas

college campuses and one was hosted at a media company. All study procedures were approved by the human subjects committee at our home institution. Of the 461 high school journalists responding to the survey, 361 (78 percent) were female and 100 (22

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Critical pedagogy and Socially Responsible Investing (SRI)

Questioning our post-secondary institutions’ investment strategies

David P. Thomas

Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) is used to describe investment practices that involve ethical or moral considerations when selecting options for investing individual or institutional funds. A growing number of university and college campuses have