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A Transtextual Hermeneutic Journey

Horst Rosenthal's Mickey au camp de Gurs (1942)

Yaakova Sacerdoti

that illuminates all the ways in which one text, the hypertext, can modify a previous text, the hypotext. 17 Horst Rosenthal wrote and drew what seems to be the earliest comic book about the Holocaust, Mickey . 18 Focusing on three out of Genette

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Black October

Comics, Memory, and Cultural Representations of 17 October 1961

Claire Gorrara

obfuscation of the events by the French state has led individuals and groups to seek alternative routes for recognition. This article will explore one of these alternative routes: Octobre noir , a comic book collaboration between writer Didier Daeninckx and

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Guillaume Lecomte

Although non-fiction works constitute an essential and exciting part of comic book production, and have received both critical praise and attention, they are conspicuous by their absence from screen(s) in the midst of the numerous film adaptations

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Gazing at Medusa

Adaptation as Phallocentric Appropriation in Blue Is the Warmest Color

Marion Krauthaker and Roy Connolly

will show. Taking Blue Is the Warmest Color as an example, 7 we explore how auctorial choices in adaptations can lead to radical shifts in female representations and thoroughly alter statements on womanhood. While Julie Maroh’s comic book (2010) acts

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“Let Us Be Giants”

Masculinity Nostalgia and Military Edutainment in South Asian War Comics

Tehmina Pirzada

remained sporadic due to the dearth of local publishers and limited readership. An interest in creating Pakistan's “softer” image, especially after 9/11, however, led to a demand for diversified storytelling, enabling indie illustrators and comic book

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Carl Plantinga

comic book graphics. Slowed down like this, they better resemble the frames and pages of the comics, with their stylized virile posing and capacity to capture the high moments of the action. It also highlights and emphasizes the fighting, further

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Imagining Multicultural London

Containment and Excess in Snatch

Rachel Garfield

Snatch (Guy Ritchie, 2000) is a comic-book gangster film that can be seen to represent the backlash against perceived notions of political correctness in what is effectively a public-schoolboy fantasy of working-class life in East London. However, the film also delineates the limits of this backlash in its depiction of minorities as either contained or excess. This is highlighted through the comic-book genre itself as well as the characterization. Thus, this article explores the tension between the genre, representation and Jewish identity.

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Ann Miller, Patricia Mainardi, Karin Kukkonen, Viviane Alary, Jaqueline Berndt, Tony Venezia, and Jennifer Anderson Bliss

CONFERENCE REVIEW

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women – Communities of Experience? One-day symposium, JW3, Jewish Community Centre for London, 12 November 2014

BOOK REVIEWS

Thierry Smolderen, The Origins of Comics: From William Hogarth to Winsor McCay, trans. Bart Beaty and Nick Nguyen

Julia Round, Gothic in Comics and Graphic Novels: A Critical Approach

François-Emmanuel Boucher, Sylvain David and Maxime Prévost, eds, Mythologies du superhéros: Histoire, physiologie, géographie, intermédialités

Dan Mazur and Alexander Danner, Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present

Annessa Ann Babic, ed., Comics as History, Comics as Literature: Roles of the Comic Book in Scholarship, Society, and Entertainment

Jane Tolmie, ed., Drawing from Life: Memory and Subjectivity in Comic Art

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A Clear Line to Marcinelle

The Importance of Line in Émile Bravo's Spirou à Bruxelles

Bart Beaty

This article considers Émile Bravo's screenprint, Spirou à Bruxelles, in order to analyse the relations that existed between the two dominant styles of comic book drawing in Belgium during the mid-twentieth century: the ligne claire style associated with Le Journal de Tintin and the Marcinelle school characterised by artists affiliated with Le Journal de Spirou. Working outward from the specific details of this image, the article situates Spirou within the history of Belgian children's publishing, and the world of modernist and surrealist painting as it can be encapsulated in the figure of René Magritte. The article suggests that the study of line has been historically overlooked by comics studies, and suggests ways by which this absence might be rectified.

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Graphic Wounds

The Comics Journalism of Joe Sacco

Tristram Walker

This article explores the graphic reportage of Joe Sacco and his comic book travels through the conflict zones of Bosnia and Palestine. It traces the roots of travel writing comics to the politically antagonistic work of underground artists such as Robert Crumb and S. Clay Wilson, the alternative autobiographical scene that followed and how this informs the work of Sacco. The article analyzes two of Sacco's texts in particular, Palestine (2003) and Safe Area Gorazde (2000), looking at them as a whole and subjecting individual panels and sequences to close readings. This analysis teases out the ways in which Sacco engages with trauma and the wounded. It argues that although explicit violent imagery could be considered exploitative and voyeuristic, Sacco uses it to restore a sense of humanity to those dehumanized by the pace of globalized media.