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Drawing National Boundaries in Barr's Ba-Bru Comic Strip Advertising

David Leishman

-running advertising campaign, spanning from March 1939 to October 1970, as a series of comic strip ads entitled ‘The Adventures of Ba-Bru’ (hereinafter, AB-B) ( Figure 1 ). 2 These featured an eponymous Indian boy in humorous adventures that revolved around securing

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Comic, Tragic, and Burlesque Burkean Responses to Hate

Notes from Counterprotests of Antigay Pickets

Barrett-Fox Rebecca

opportunities for redemption or renewal. They can be burlesque, caricaturizing the enemy as absurd, using ridicule to dismiss the enemy ( Burke 1937: 54 ). Like the tragic frame, the burlesque frame does not open opportunities for redemption. Frames can be comic

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Comic Art and Commitment

An Interview with Morvandiau

Ann Miller and Morvandiau

This interview with political cartoonist and comics artist Morvandiau focuses mainly on his 2007 comic book D'Algérie. After the murder in 1994 of his Uncle Jean, a père blanc ['white father'] in Tizi Ouzou, along with three of his fellow priests, followed by the failed suicide of his father, a Pied-noir, eight years later, Morvandiau decided to carry out research into his family and its links with France's colonial adventure. Through the resources of the comic art medium, he was able to give form to a story which is both personal and public (Figures 1-2). The subtle and sober portrayal of his search for identity is contextualised by a highly absorbing panorama of political events. In the interview, he explains some of the aesthetic choices that he made, and discusses the challenges of working from documentary material, and how he drew on the resources of the medium to tackle issues of individual and collective identity.

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Dr. Strangelove and the Psychology of Comic Distance

Marc Hye-Knudsen

’ emotional distress, the former instead invites empathic detachment and comic amusement. By comparing how each film plays the same essential story for drama and for laughs respectively, I thus hope to shed light on both the psychology of comic distance and

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Narrative Markers in Pablo Picasso’s Tragicomic Strip The Dream and Lie of Franco

Michael Schuldiner

It is well-known that both Picasso and his model/mistress Fernande Olivier were immensely drawn to the comic strips found in the American newspapers that they received from Gertrude Stein on Sundays while living together in Paris. In fact, when

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Comic Art in Museums and Museums in Comic Art

Michael D. Picone

Initially, being mass produced and sequential, comic art was excluded from fine art museums. Some comics artists themselves have expressed ambivalence about the value of inclusion (but counter-arguments are proposed, challenging the perception of incompatibility). However, a pivotal element in the break from the ranks of artistic modernism has been the appropriation of comic art motifs for use in museum-grade pop art, figuration narrative and their successors. In counterpoint, comic art is replete with examples of museum art being appropriated in order to obtain diegetic enrichment of various sorts, either for the purpose of parody or in relation to plot construction. Against this backdrop, and abetted by the twin challenge that art museums are facing to remain relevant and to increase revenue, a game-changing development is afoot, leading to a co-operative re-positioning of art museums and comics artists. With the Louvre taking the lead, many art museums in France and Italy are now commissioning works of comic art based on the museum's own collections, often launched with companion exhibits. The resultant 'art within art' lends itself readily to rich experimentation with themes incorporating intertextuality and parallel narrative.

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European Comic Art and Quebec

Bill Marshall

The welcome attention paid to Quebec in this issue of European Comic Art immediately points to a cluster of intellectual questions concerning identity, territory and academic discipline(s). What need was there for grouping a corpus, and analysis of it, according to this category, and what meanings are implied in that selection? And what problems are evoked by the adjective ‘European’? These are familiar questions to all those Quebec specialists working in French (‘and Francophone’) Studies, as well as, in my case, Film Studies. On the one hand, Quebec culture in all its forms of expression possesses a relevance and richness, due to historical and spatial factors I shall outline below, but is largely off the radar of the disciplines and sub-disciplines it could enrich. This is no more true than in French Studies, where it is difficult, but also necessary, topical (witness the continuing debate, five years after the manifesto, around littérature-monde) and urgent, to challenge the hierarchy implied in the centre and periphery generated by ‘(and) Francophone’. The challenge is to place Quebec in an endlessly comparative relationship with other French-speaking cultures, with other Atlantic spaces, in order to break down the barriers implied in an often ghettoised ‘specialisation’. Here bande dessinée scholarship has an interesting advantage, in that, despite the phenomenal cultural weight of the art form within metropolitan French life, a decidedly non-metropolitan space, namely Belgium, offers a central position. The opportunity is there to emphasise lateral connections that bypass as well as include metropolitan France, hence the work here on Tintin in Quebec. To an extent, bande-dessinée-monde, to coin a phrase, is already a reality.

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A French Comic Version of an Argentinian Fantastic Narrative

Jean Pierre Mourey's L'Invention de Morel

Matthias Hausmann

In 1940, Adolfo Bioy Casares published La Invención de Morel [The Invention of Morel], a novel that can be considered as one of the most important works of twentieth-century Argentinian fantastic narrative. Since the novel portrays competition between different media, it is not surprising that this work has been adapted to several other media: visual arts, plays, opera, and several feature films, the first and still the best known being L'Année dernière à Marienbad [Last year in Marienbad] (1961). The latest incarnation of La Invención de Morel is the first comic version, created by Jean Pierre Mourey (2007). This article discusses Mourey's adaptation of the novel and the specific possibilities of the comic genre. Special attention will be paid to the conception of time, the manipulation of various media, and the competition between the written word and images which are at the heart of Bioy's novel, and the extent to which the French cartoonist's rendering of these aspects of the work is successful.

Cover European Comic Art

European Comic Art

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‘Between Stage and Page’

La vida es sueño as Comic Book

Daniela Kuschel

, translation and adaptation to other media like film and, recently, comics. The latter is the object of the present study, which analyses how Ricardo Vílbor, Alberto Sanz and Mario Ceballos's homonymous comic book adaptation (henceforth referred to as La