Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "comics cultures" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Antonio Lázaro-Reboll

Any examination of the constitution of the Spanish field of comics between 1965 and 1975 requires a detailed contextualisation of wider historical, social and cultural processes across national borders and of the formation of comics cultures in

Free access

Introduction

Re-viewing the Past and Facing the Future

Laurence Grove, Anne Magnussen, and Ann Miller

shares her love of the medium and her experience of solidarity among her fellow artists but has a cooler appraisal of the current political scene and the health of the comics culture in the United Kingdom. Philippe Delisle returns to the original black

Restricted access

Jimmy Beaulieu

A brief historical overview considers a number of factors that were not propitious for the development of a home-grown comics culture in Quebec (notwithstanding the popularity of a few noteworthy artists) including the impossibility of competing with cheaper American production, and the ambient conservatism that dominated much of the twentieth century. Beaulieu goes on to describe the shock and excitement of his discovery in the mid-1990s of an alternative comics scene (more active in Montreal than in Quebec City), and his own involvement in it from the beginning of the twenty-first century as an artist, publisher and teacher. He offers a firsthand account of the realities of negotiating the pressures of alternative comics publishing within the two structures that he set up: Mécanique Générale and the smaller and (still) more radical Colosse. There are pleasures: the ethos of collective work, the opportunity to support up-and-coming young authors and to ensure the survival of work by an illustrious predecessor, invitations to take part in productive exchanges on a local, national and international level, and the sheer obsessive pursuit of perfectionism. But there are also frustrations: the never-ending grind of getting manuscripts ready for the printer, wearying battles with publishers' reps, the constant need to manage the expectations of authors and the skewing of the market by competitors prepared to outsource printing to Asia. The author explains his decision finally to withdraw from his publishing commitments and to focus on his own work. His conclusion, about the future of comic production in Quebec, is, however, optimistic and devoid of cynicism.

Free access

Editorial

Comics and Transnational Exchanges

Lawrence Grove, Anne Magnussen, and Ann Miller

the growth of a comics culture that was not only open to indigenously produced works but also served as a meeting point for transnational stylistic and thematic tendencies, including manga, taken up by German artists and representing an ongoing

Free access

Introduction

Mise en abyme

Laurence Grove, Anne Magnussen, and Ann Miller

different countries and comics cultures, including, notably, our colleague Paul Gravett. Groensteen is not without a certain frustration that the period of his editorship coincided with the dominance of a somewhat conservative tendency in comics publishing

Free access

Editorial

A Historical Focus on Comics

Lawrence Grove, Anne Magnussen, and Ann Miller

were, though, produced within the shop system adopted from the US comics industry, along with the US-style comic book, albeit with the Italian landscape format. As Gandolfo and Turnes demonstrate, the development of the rich comics culture of Argentina

Restricted access

Schemata in the Graphic Novel Persepolis

Accommodation, Combination, Integration

Fredrik Strömberg

Graphic novels are often created within specific comics cultures, which influence visual aspects such as format, page layout, and style. 1 However, the art in graphic novels can still be highly individual and can conceivably contain influences

Restricted access

David Miranda-Barreiro, Michelle Herte, Joe Sutliff Sanders, and Mark McKinney

original version (aimed at a Spanish-speaking readership), in its translated form this helps to raise awareness of a comics culture that is usually left aside in international publications. Moreover, as the author himself acknowledges, García’s work is not

Restricted access

Thierry Groensteen

Caniff. All these intermediaries helped me to see the blindingly obvious: there was no such thing as a comics culture that did not include the United States. 21 From then on, Les Cahiers began to pay homage to some masters: Milton Caniff, Alex Raymond

Restricted access

The Medium Is the Message

Olivier Schrauwen’s Arsène Schrauwen beyond Expectations of Autobiography, Colonial History and the Graphic Novel

Benoît Crucifix and Gert Meesters

carelessness of Arsène displays traits of a boredom typical of some graphic novels. 66 Working within that paradigm, Schrauwen nevertheless brings in references to popular comics and displays a rootedness in classic comics culture. 67 For one thing, Schrauwen