Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 132 items for :

  • "common sense" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jingyi Li

balance different types of gender behavior in textbooks. One editor claimed that: I don’t think we consciously emphasized the traditional social gender role in textbooks. It is just “common sense” I suppose. It is like an invisible standard … this is not

Free access

Introduction

Concepts of Emotions in Indian Languages

Margrit Pernau

common sense interpretations of emotions or making way for different concepts, it would be psychologists who offer the correct definition of emotions, viewed as a stable object that is not influenced by the way it is interpreted: “The speakers of English

Free access

Echoes arising from two cases of the private administration of populations

African immigrants in twentieth-century Spain and Indians in nineteenth-century Ecuador

Andrés Guerrero

The article simultaneously explores three lines of reflection and analysis woven around the comparative reverberations (in space and time) between citizenship and the administration of populations (states of exception) in the Republic of Ecuador during the nineteenth century and the Kingdom of Spain in the twenty century. The first thread tries to answer the question whether it is possible for concepts generated in a country of the Global South to be used usefully in analyzing a different Northern reality, inverting the usual direction in the flows of transfer and importation of “theory.“ The second theme of comparative reverberation explores a network of concepts concerning the citizenship of common sense and the administration of populations, that is the “back-patio“ aspect of citizenship, particularly its historical formation in the domination of populations in the Republic of Ecuador during the nineteenth century. It is centered on the process of identification in the daily exchanges between interpares citizens and extrapares non-citizens. The last section involves testing concepts forged in the author's studies of Ecuadorian history for their utility in analyzing the current situation of modern sub-Saharan immigrants in Spain (using concrete examples), and their reclusion to the private sphere in spaces of exception and abandonment. Here, the article concentrates on the difference between the public administration of populations and the private administration of citizens. The article uses documentary material relating to nineteenth-century Ecuador and twentieth-century Spain and Senegal.

Free access

John Clarke

This article explores the significance of the work of Stuart Hall for social and political anthropology. It identifies the concern with concrete conjunctural analysis, the continuing attention to the problem of hegemony, and the centrality of a politics of articulation in theory and practice as core features of Hall's work. The article also touches on his complex relationship with theory and theorizing while grounding his work in a series of political and ethical commitments within and beyond the university.

Restricted access

Peter Vale

Higher education reform has a particular character in the United Kingdom as Stefan Collini points out in his book, What are universities for? Margaret Thatcher's assault on social institutions put the university, as an institution for the common good, under particular economic pressure. As a result, British-oriented higher education systems world- the legacy of Empire - have suffered similar mounting pressures. This includes South Africa where the debate has been strongly influenced by the idea that university, in the name of democracy, should be more accountable and transparent. But, this purported shift towards openness masks the powerful hold of market-driven economics on the contemporary university and poses a threat to its immediate purpose and the long-term future of higher education.

Restricted access

Charles Bradford Bow

This article examines the “progress” of Scottish metaphysics during the long eighteenth century. The scientific cultivation of natural knowledge drawn from the examples of Sir Francis Bacon (1561–1626), John Locke (1632–1704), and Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a defining pursuit in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Aberdonian philosopher George Dalgarno (1616–1687); Thomas Reid (1710–1796), a member of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society known as the Wise Club; and the professor of moral philosophy at Edinburgh University Dugald Stewart (1753–1828), contributed to that Scottish pattern of philosophical thinking. The question of the extent to which particular external senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell) might be improved when others were damaged or absent from birth attracted their particular interest. This article shows the different ways in which Scottish anatomists of the mind resolved Molyneux’s Problem of whether or not an agent could accurately perceive an object from a newly restored external sense.

Restricted access

Danai S. Mupotsa

Becoming-girl-woman-bride refers to the various positions and transformations of the bride. The girl and the bride as related in becoming-bride are the site of intense sociocultural investment and anxiety played out in the central role the bride takes in the wedding ritual. I draw from autoethnographic material, interviews, and bridal magazines, specifically those in circulation in South Africa that include representations of black women as brides. I conclude this article with an argument about the black femme as a so-called girly line of flight that produces our image of common sense, albeit with a different relation to visibility. Moving from the premise that common sense is overwhelmed by the visual sense, I position the black femme in relation to the image of common sense and I offer a reading of how images produce a range of simultaneous identifications and disidentifications, particularly in relation to the image of the ideal bride.

Restricted access

Creating the People as ‘One’?

On Democracy and Its Other

Marta Nunes da Costa

, stable among all possible worlds, then a different question emerges: how can we attribute a meaning to democracy and under which conditions can we do so? Let us start by looking at the uses we make of ‘democracy’ in our language. It is common sense today

Free access

On the shelves labelled ‘Just published and shortly to be remaindered’, customers of ‘all the best bookstores’ will perhaps notice a volume by Mr Clive James entitled Cultural Memories: Necessary Memories from History and the Arts. Indeed, it would be hard not to notice this 876 page monument to its author’s verbosity. US readers will perhaps not recognise the name of this television critic turned Conscience of the Twentieth Century, but UK readers will be long familiar with his inimitable brand of soft right-wing bombast masquerading as common sense and delivered with ponderous wit.

Open access

Mark Bergfeld

Kate Khatib, Margaret Killjoy, & Mike McGuire (2012) We Are Many. Reflections on Movement Strategy from Occupation to Liberation. Edinburgh/San Francisco: AK Press, pp. 355, ISBN-13: 9781849351164.

David Graeber (2012) The Democracy Project: A History, a Crisis, a Movement. London: Allen Lane Press, pp. 352, ISBN: 9781846146633.

It is a common sense assumption to emphasise the leaderless, horizontal, networked and demandless nature of the Occupy movement of late 2011 (Penny 2011, Mason 2011, Castells 2012). Two recent publications - Laura Khatib’s We Are Many: Reflections on Movement Strategy – From Occupation to Liberation and David Graeber’s The Democracy Project - explore the role anarchists played inside of the Occupy movement of 2011.