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Impatient Accumulation, Immediate Consumption

Problems with Money and Hope in Central Kenya

Peter Lockwood

lack the money to experience them. Raha is a sign of a life well lived, and to simulate it is to simulate a life that is not one's own, since money is the facilitator of such conspicuous and enjoyable consumption. This article describes the style of

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Mariano González-Delgado and Manuel Ferraz-Lorenzo

This article explains the approach to mass consumption developed in social studies textbooks in the early years of the transition to democracy in Spain. It begins by examining the way in which school textbooks represented consumer society and mass media in the late 1970s. This is followed by an in-depth explanation of the reasons that led the authors of these textbooks to choose one theoretical framework over another. Above all, this article emphasizes the complexity and variety of the historical materials used to represent consumer society, and how this process of social construction is reflected in the textbook content of the time.

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Overconsumption as Ideology

Implications for Addressing Global Climate Change

Diana Stuart, Ryan Gunderson and Brian Petersen

terms of personal consumption. For example, a CNN article highlighted “what consumers can do,” listing changes in personal transportation (e.g., buy a hybrid car) and housing (e.g., buy a more efficient air conditioner), among others ( Mackintosh 2018

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“Tobacco! Tobacco!”

Exporting New Habits to Siberia and Russian America

Matthew P. Romaniello

While traveling along the coast of Kamchatka in 1787 and 1788, the French diplomat Jean-Baptiste-Barthélemy de Lesseps noted widespread tobacco consumption among the local population. Among the Koryaks, he observed that “all the inhabitants of this

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Introduction

Rethinking the class politics of boredom

Marguerite van den Berg and Bruce O’Neill

, the crisis-accelerated restructuring captured by “the posts” of postsocialism, postcolonialism, and post-Fordism requires a rethinking of the relationship between status, production, consumption, and the experience of excess free time. In cities across

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Miley, What’s Good?

Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda, Instagram Reproductions, and Viral Memetic Violence

Aria S. Halliday

overall symbolic power of representation. Sparse representations of Black women and girls in the mass media make Minaj’s salience and appropriation that much more important to our understanding of the consumption of Black bodies in social media contexts in

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Financialization from the margins

Notes on the incorporation of Argentina's subproletariat into consumer credit (2009–2015)

Hadrien Saiag

, the incomes allowed them to maintain consumption standards slightly above their neighbors’ (they sent Natalia's older child to a low-cost private school, and they sometimes bought fine foods in one of Rosario's supermarkets). However, their fragile

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Ana Horta, Harold Wilhite, Luísa Schmidt and Françoise Bartiaux

Energy consumption inconspicuously bridges nature and culture. Modern societies and cultures depend on intensive energy use from the extraction of natural resources. In fact, the industrialization process required large amounts of energy, but main sources such as oil and coal, have been gradually depleted and found to be heavily polluting the environment. Despite their environmental impacts, these resources have provided cheap and abundant power to fuel technological progress and economic growth. (See Agustoni and Maretti [2012] for a good historical summary of the relations between energy production and usages.)

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Consuming Leisure Time

Landscapes of Infinite Horizons

Mark Vacher

The aim of this article is to explore the Danish seaside as a culturally framed arena of experience. In the first part of the article, I present the appearance of Denmark's seaside as a recreational location for the Danish middle class. Using Danish films that portray the middle class on holiday, the article illustrates the perceptual consequences of a specific appropriation of the landscape. The analysis of the relationship between landscape and people then introduces anthropological perspectives on time, consumption, and perception. Drawing on ethnographic interviews and comparative observations, I show how accessing and consuming the landscape as a recreational location come to constitute it as a finite arena of infinite time and space, as well as a distinct location that allows for equal social relations.

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Luísa Schmidt, Ana Horta, Augusta Correia and Susana Fonseca

In a time of economic crisis the need to adopt energy conservation practices comes to the fore. It is helpful to evaluate the role of young people as both consumers and potential agents of change bridging the gap between school and family to encourage lower household energy consumption. Based on two surveys of parents and students of a secondary school in Lisbon, plus in-depth interviews with parents, this article analyzes the complexity of this challenge, highlighting adults' perceptions of their children's contribution to energy saving. Results show that parents see young people as major energy consumers. Young people's engagement with electronic equipment as essential components of their lifestyles and their belief in technology as a solution to energy problems thwart them from being promoters of energy saving. In this context of scarcity, parents try to protect their children's well-being and opportunities in life by accepting their children's unrestricted energy use.