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Open access

Anthropology from Home

Advice on Digital Ethnography for the Pandemic Times

Magdalena Góralska

, not only posing a danger to their health, but also affecting their social relationships and financial situations. While it is hard to predict whether the coronavirus pandemic will indeed become the generational experience some are predicting it will be

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Kirill Chunikhin

Open access

Museums and the Pandemic, One Year On

Some Reflections on Academic Resilience

Joanna Cobley

Border closures due to the coronavirus pandemic have highlighted the importance of encouraging critical engagement and fostering international collaborations. One year on, with travel plans still halted, the museum and heritage studies community

Free access

Paul L. Scham and Yoram Peri

related to current events around the world, especially in the US, sometimes even competing with the coronavirus pandemic for the headlines. See the guest editors’ introduction immediately following this note for a fuller exposition before delving into the

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Perverse Economies of Intimate and Personal Labour

Resuming Domestic Work in Households after the Lockdown

Pooja Satyogi

, https://www.livelaw.in/pdf_upload/pdf_upload-376291.pdf (accessed 21 June 2020 ). Ganguly , S. ( 2020 ), ‘ India's Coronavirus Pandemic Shines a Light on the Curse of Caste ’, The Conversation , 2 June , https://theconversation.com/indias-coronavirus-pandemic

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Olga Zdravomyslova and Elena Onegina

Introduction: Living at Risk The coronavirus pandemic has been a huge source of stress for countries and regions around the world, and Russia is no exception. The first cases of coronavirus in Russia were recorded in March 2020. In July 2020

Open access

Learning to Dwell with Micro-Organisms

Corporeality, Relationality, Temporality

Lydia Maria Arantes

Abstract

In this article, I enquire in which ways the corona-induced lockdown in Austria has reshaped intimacy in our household by scrutinising my husband's sourdough bread-making journey. As physical distancing has thrown us back onto ourselves, my field of research is equivalent to that which is immediately available – our everyday life within the confines of domestic space, at times expanded via digital technologies. My elaborations are based on my (research) diary in which I usually conflate personal and research-related aspects of my everyday life. As, during lockdown, (entries on) bread-making and caring for sourdoughs came to play an important role, I became inspired to unfold issues of corporeality, relationality and temporality with regard to newly developing intimacies, interdependencies and modes of knowing.

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Transfers at a Crossroads

An Anthropological Perspective

Noel B. Salazar

Abstract

In this short article, I offer a personal reflection on my own mobilities and how these influenced my academic interest in human movement and brought me in contact with mobility studies and Transfers. On the special occasion of the journal's tenth anniversary, I look back at how the journal has fared. I remind readers of the initial plans and expectations that were expressed by the founding editors, with a focus on issues that are important from an anthropological point of view. I complement this critical and constructive analysis with a brief look into the future. In which direction should Transfers ideally be moving? What are the implications of societal developments such as the ones surrounding the coronavirus pandemic for the journal and its thematic focus?

Open access

‘Everybody's Always Here with Me!’

Pandemic Proximity and the Lockdown Family

Hannah McNeilly and Koreen M. Reece

Abstract

Social distancing has been the central public health strategy for tackling the coronavirus pandemic worldwide. But the ‘Stay Home, Stay Safe’ order in the United Kingdom and the consequent closure of nurseries and schools also created an unprecedented degree of proximity within households. Based on interviews with mothers of young children in Scotland, this article provides early insight into the ways that mothers manage the forced intimacies of family life under lockdown and the opportunities they create through the innovative management of space and time. The result is a more expansive understanding of the family in contemporary Scotland and a notion of intimacy characterised as much by the necessity of distance and distinction as by proximity and mutuality.

Free access

Working on this issue in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic shutdown is a tad surreal. One wants to resist the many voices who breathlessly proclaim that everything will be different “AC” (after corona). Besides the horrible health and economic aftereffects, things will likely be rather similar to the situation “BC” (before corona). Then again, maybe this will be some sort of turning point. For instance, western societies—particularly Germany—have long been oriented to the past. There were so many worthy anniversaries that some actually contemplated maintaining an “anniversary tracker” so as not to miss anything important. Suddenly, we are forced to be focused on the present and daunting future; and the near obsession with commemorations of various kinds appears to be coming to an end. Just months ago, many were looking forward to massive and internationally coordinated commemorations of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the end of WWII. Many countries indeed carried on with scaled-down events, but the coverage and resonance were minimal.