Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 734 items for :

  • "corporatization" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Standardizing responsibility through the stakeholder figure

Norwegian hydropower in Turkey

Ståle Knudsen, Ingrid Birce Müftüoğlu, and Isabelle Hugøy

corporate social responsibility (CSR) officer for their large construction site Çetin in southeast Turkey—a project that confronted a variety of challenges, including political conflict among impacted communities. In reviewing candidates, they were looking

Restricted access

Corporate Sustainability

An Academic Review

Varghese Joy

Every corporate house across the world has to make decisions directly or indirectly about societal questions related with the ecosystem. These decisions concern manufacturing processes, the use of technology, labor relations, the acquisition and

Open access

Corporate Social Responsibility

The Great Shell Game

Ellen Hertz

corporate managers who factor social and environmental considerations into their decision-making are, in effect, ‘imposing taxes … and deciding how the tax proceeds shall be spent’. By deviating from their organizational duties—maximizing profits for the

Open access

The Role of Law in Corporate Accountability

Stuart Kirsch

to protect its citizens and nature against corporate malfeasance are imagined in new ways (Affolter, this issue). Collectively, the articles explore the role of law in managing relations between corporations, communities, and the state, including

Restricted access

Utopian Spaces, Dystopian Places?: A Local Community-Based Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility

Zoe Bray and Christian Thauer

Introduction This article explores corporate social responsibility in relation to globalization utopias and dystopias. On the one hand, globalization is a new political space that provides hope for a better life to many underprivileged people

Restricted access

Re-siting corporate responsibility

The making of South Africa's Avon entrepreneurs

Catherine Dolan and Mary Johnstone-Louis

The bottom-of-the-pyramid (BOP) approach is championed as a way to deliver both corporate profits and poverty reduction. This article explores how “the poor” are repurposed as the instruments of ethical capitalism through the archetypal BOP model—Avon Cosmetics. A harbinger of “compassionate capitalism,” Avon has long stylized its entrepreneurial opportunity as a channel to a transcendent realm of self-actualization and social transformation. The company pursues this vision through a set of discourses and calculative practices that aim to produce industrious, self-disciplined, and empowered “entrepreneurs.” However, while BOP systems like Avon may provide a viable income stream for “poor” women, the practices through which women are “converted” into enterprising subjects can confound their intended “empowerment” effects. The article suggests that while targeting the “bottom of the pyramid” may elide the distinction between the maximization of profit and the imperatives of sustainable development, devolving corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the “entrepreneurial poor” raises questions about the implications of “making poverty business.”

Restricted access

Collective contradictions of "corporate" environmental conservation

Rebecca Hardin

Relationships emerging between corporate actors and environmental conservation organizations range from partnerships in field operations to gifts brokered at the upper echelons of corporate and nongovernmental organization (NGO) management. Drawing on Mauss’s original formulation of “the gift,” I consider the social consequences and contexts of these relationships, over various territorial and temporal scales. I argue that recent critiques of conservation NGOs for having “sold out” to corporate interests obscure a more nuanced view of such relationships, their roots in the history of wildlife conservation under colonial circumstances, and their connections to new modes of hybrid environmental governance. These latter include transformations in corporate practice vis-à-vis consumer preference, processes of certification, and educational impacts on professional training for industry personnel, as well as the adoption by many NGOs of terminologies and planning processes from the corporate world. These relational norms and institutional transformations make any oversimplified notion of corporate responsibility insufficient with respect to environmental sectors.

Open access

Audit failure and corporate corruption

Why Mediterranean patron-client relations are relevant for understanding the work of international accountancy firms

Cris Shore

financial crisis, an event triggered by corporate greed, poor governance, complacent regulators, and reckless risk-taking by the banks (which had to be bailed out by massive public funds 1 ), there has been a continuous spate of high-profile fraud and

Restricted access

A Sociality of, and beyond, 'My-home' in Post-corporate Japan

Anne Allison

Emerging from the defeat of the Second World War, Japan shifted its national lens from empire building abroad to productivity and prosperity at home. Organized around a particular form of sociality and capitalist economics, citizens worked hard for 'myhomeism' - the attachments (of men at the workplace, women to the household, children to school) that fuelled fast-growth economics and rising consumerism. In the last two decades of economic decline and more irregular employment, the 'nestling' of family and corporate capitalism has begun to unravel. In the 'lost decade' of the 1990s, many young Japanese assumed the ranks of what activist Karin Amamiya calls the 'precariat' - those precariously un(der)employed, unable to assume the social citizenship of my-homeism, and existentially bereft. How are people not only surviving hard times but also remaking their ties of social connectedness and their calculus of human worth?

Restricted access

Imagining the Girl Effect

An Ethnography of Corporate Social Responsibility

Carolina Garcia

Kathryn Moeller. 2018. The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Politics of Development. Oakland, CA. University of California Press. In this timely ethnography, Kathryn Moeller explores how adolescent girls in Third