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Conflicting Visions of Urban Regeneration in a New Political and Economic Order

The Example of the Former Bicycle Factory ROG in Ljubljana, Slovenia

Kornelia Ehrlich

This article analyses the phenomenon of urban regeneration and development in the context of globalisation and processes of Europeanisation with a focus on culture and creativity. It asks how the process of negotiating EU-rope is being reflected in places situated at the 'edge' of the European Union and which actors are involved in these processes of negotiating EU-rope, its culture, values and urban regeneration. The author presents an empirical example from Ljubljana, Slovenia. The focus lies on negotiating the usage and development of an abandoned industrial site. Here, different ideas of negotiating and developing the city in the context of globalisation and Europeanisation come to the fore: top-down approaches that follow the image of a creative city as well as bottom-up initiatives that develop anti-global and anti-capitalistic criticism with the help of social-spatial and cultural practices.

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The Culture Industries

Symbolic Economies and Critical Practices

Malcolm Miles

Art has become a ubiquitous if at times convenient solution to problems of urban regeneration and social division. Generally, it takes the form of commissioned works or projects in development schemes, supported by state bureaucracies and funding agencies, which view the arts as expedient in relation to problems produced by other areas of policy, from unemployment to social exclusion. Currently, a shift can be detected in arts policy toward a restatement of the aesthetic approach characteristic of the post-war years, in which art does best what art alone does. At the same time, there has been a growth of new, mainly collaborative art practices, constituting a dissidence reliant on art's structures of support while seeking to subvert their intentions. The article outlines the perceived role of art in urban economic development, suggests that a shift in policy is taking place, and describes the new cultural dissidence through specific cases.

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Charlotte Prové, Denise Kemper, and Salma Loudiyi

Creative City Politics in the City of Rotterdam ”. Cities 51 : 1 – 10 . doi:10.1016/j.cities.2015.12.001 . 10.1016/j.cities.2015.12.001 Curry , Nigel R. , Matt Reed , Daniel Keech , Damian Maye , and James Kirwan . 2014 . “ Urban

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Sheila K. Hoffman, Dominique Poulot, Bruno Brulon-Soares, and Joanna Cobley

of future generations ( McGivern 2019 ). 18 This old and venerable refrain did not seem to convince either the city's entrepreneurs, who needed to promote Paris as a “creative city” and favored new architectural statements, or its politicians, who