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Kokums to the Iskwêsisisak

COVID-19 and Urban Métis Girls and Young Women

Carly Jones, Renée Monchalin, Cheryllee Bourgeois, and Janet Smylie

cultural knowledge from the Kokums to the Iskwêsisisak . It is because of this rich matrilineal knowledge base and the strengths of our knowledge exchange systems that Métis communities have resisted and survived colonial attempts to erase our ways of

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Interruptions: Challenges and Innovations in Exhibition-Making

The Second World Museologies Workshop, National Museum of Ethnology (MINPAKU), Osaka, December 2019

Laura Osorio Sunnucks, Nicola Levell, Anthony Shelton, Motoi Suzuki, Gwyneira Isaac, and Diana E. Marsh

manage cultural knowledge. Nevertheless, in spite of the discipline's reflexive turn ( Clifford 1988 ; Clifford and Marcus 1986 ; Comaroff and Comaroff 2009 ; Marcus and Fischer 1986 ; Rabinow 2006 ), many museums remain encumbered by core

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Putting the Culture into Bioculturalism

A Naturalized Aesthetics and the Challenge of Modernism

Dominic Topp

naturalistic approach, which can help us explain their accessibility to a wide international audience), a film such as Heimat is designed for “narrower audiences possessing specific sorts of cultural knowledge” (166). Third, Smith’s choice of Heimat is

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Global Health Disparities and a Qashqa'i Nomadic Pastoralist Tribesman's Tale as a Health Worker

Mohammad Shahbazi

This article presents an account of a Qashqa'i health worker's upbringing, education and training, noting in particular his transition from life in a traditional nomadic family through completion of a formal education. The health worker, Jamal, describes certain problems of modernity and the personal conflict he faces as someone who loves his culture but also wants to see improvements in the health status of his people. Written by a Qashqa'i author, who brings his own sensitivity and cultural knowledge to the text, the article makes some recommendations about the training and integration of rural health workers in Iran.

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The Anti-Politics of Inclusion

Citizen Engagement with Newcomers in Norway

María Hernández-Carretero

’ that highlighted the ‘excessively high’ rates of unemployment among refugees (Regjeringen 2018: 21) and stressed the need for immigrants to acquire linguistic and cultural knowledge and participate in the labour market to ensure the stability of the

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Black Placemaking under Environmental Stressors

Dryland Farming in the Arid Black Pacific, 1890–1930

Maya L. Shamsid-Deen and Jayson M. Porter

Abstract

Dry farming, or techniques of cultivating crops in regions with domineering dry seasons, was central to Black agricultural life across the Black diaspora, but especially in the Black Pacific. Ecologically, the Black diaspora transformed semi-arid ecosystems in both the Atlantic and Pacific. However, there is a dearth of Black narratives that draw on the ecological and botanical relationships held with the land. Through a collaborative botanical and historical approach that blends historical ecology and botany, we evaluate how Black placemaking occurred despite arid climatic stressors and as a result of ecological and cultural knowledge systems. Highlighting Black agricultural life in Costa Chica, Mexico and Blackdom, New Mexico, we argue that people and plants made cimarronaje (or collective and situated Black placemaking) possible in the Western coasts and deserts of Mexico and New Mexico through botanical knowledge systems of retaining water and cultivating a life in water-scarce environments.

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Apprenticeship and Global Institutions

Learning Japanese Psychiatry

Joshua Breslau

How is the knowledge embedded in a global institution such as psychiatry integrated into taken-for-granted understandings and everyday medical practice in a non-Western setting such as Japan? How can ethnographic research address this question without simplifying institutional complexity and cross-cultural variations? This paper argues that the ethnography of apprenticeship can resolve these tensions between global and local sources of cultural knowledge. Recent work in cognitive anthropology and practice theory has demonstrated the value of examining apprenticeship as a window onto dynamics of institutional production and reproduction. As an ethnographic strategy, the study of apprenticeship makes the processes through which knowledge crosses cultural boundaries accessible to research. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research on the training of Japanese psychiatrists, I describe the institutional structure in which psychiatric knowledge becomes embedded in newly trained psychiatrists. This system, known as the ikyoku system, reproduces many characteristics of Japanese organizational patterns. Examining the details of this system offers additional insight into the particular way in which psychiatric knowledge becomes situated in contemporary Japanese society. The theory of apprenticeship, however, has a much broader potential for informing ethnographic research strategies for studying contemporary global institutions.

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Understanding through Performance Black Boston

A City Connects

PJ Carlino

science can also be a means of transmitting cultural knowledge. In asking the audience to create its own narrative the exhibit offers a nonprejudiced way of seeing difference and opening dialogue. The exhibit participates in a trend toward more interactive

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Introduction

Comics, Caricature, and Transnational Critique

epistemology of comics may offer insights into the fabrication of cultural knowledge more generally, through its in-built self-reflexiveness. This is a strength of the medium: forfeiting any claim to the creation of a realist context, comics can enable

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Mobilizing a “Spiritual Geography”

The Art and Child Artists of the Carrolup Native School and Settlement, Western Australia

Ellen Percy Kraly and Ezzard Flowers

cultural knowledge. In 2013, the leadership of Colgate University recognized how the cultural, educational, and heritage value of the artwork would be amplified by returning the collection to Western Australia. Goals to conserve, share, and celebrate the