Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • "culture theory" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Humanity’s Subtensions

Culture Theory in US Death Penalty Mitigation

Jesse Cheng

defense advocates. The use of culture theory is but one manifestation of capital defenders’ efforts to elaborate on the nature and effects of impairment. On one level, this appetite for knowledge is driven simply by due diligence: when a human life is on

Restricted access

Sonia Hazard

Material things and phenomena have come to vie with belief and thought as worthy subjects of inquiry in the interdisciplinary study of religion. Yet, to the extent that we are justified in speaking of a “material turn”, no consensus has arisen about what materiality is or does. This article offers a preliminary sketch of the diverse terrain of material religion studies, delineating three dominant approaches to religious materiality as well as an emerging alternative. It argues that the dominant approaches—respectively characterized by an emphasis on symbolism, material disciplines, and phenomenological experience—continue to privilege the human subject while material things themselves struggle to come into sharp focus. That is, they remain anthropocentric and beholden to the biases against materiality deeply entrenched in the study of religion. Such biases may be negotiated more successfully via the emerging alternative “new materialism”.

Restricted access

Kevin Avruch

This article describes the role graduate students can play in transforming their education in the emergent field of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, as occurs at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR), at George Mason University, Washington, DC. It also unpacks how anthropology plays a role in the education of these students at the Master's and Doctoral levels. The primary contribution of anthropology to the conflict resolution curriculum has been conceptual, around the notion of culture. Most of our MS graduates, and many PhDs, work in government or NGOs specialising in development, human rights or conflict resolution, coming from diverse backgrounds with mature life experiences and without prior training in anthropology. Only four of our 21 faculty are anthropologists. This article discusses why these diverse graduate students and their anthropological faculty viewed the traditional foundations of the field of conflict analysis and resolution as inadequate, and why it required an infusion of culture theory and understanding into their training and education.

Free access

Introduction

Reinventing the Invention of Culture

Joel Robbins and David A. B. Murray

In a recent special issue of Social Analysis, Culture at the End of the Boasian Century (1997) the editors noted that the 1970s was a time of particularly intense anthropological debate about culture. They mentioned Geertz, Sahlins, Schneider and Boon as anthropologists who made some of the key theoretical contributions of that era, interrogating the meaning of the ‘culture concept’ and extending it in new directions. As much as those names conjure up a period of impressive accomplishment in anthropological culture theory, we feel there is an important omission from this list: Roy Wagner’s The Invention of Culture, first published in 1976 (with a revised volume published in 1981). In fact, we would argue that more than twentyfive years later, this book remains highly relevant to contemporary debates on the meanings and definitions of culture in anthropological circles and, indeed, to debates on the meanings and definitions of anthropology itself.

Restricted access

Laurence McFalls

In the past century, Germany, for better and for worse, offered itself

as a natural laboratory for political science. Indeed, Germany’s

excesses of political violence and its dramatic regime changes largely

motivated the development of postwar American political science,

much of it the work of German émigrés and German-Jewish

refugees, of course. The continuing vicissitudes of the German experience

have, however, posed a particular challenge to the concept of

political culture as elaborated in the 1950s and 1960s,1 at least in

part to explain lingering authoritarianism in formally democratic

West Germany. Generally associated with political continuity or only

incremental change,2 the concept of political culture has been illequipped

to deal with historical ruptures such as Germany’s “break

with civilization” of 1933-1945 and the East German popular revolution

of 1989. As well, even less dramatic but still important and relatively

rapid cultural changes such as the rise of a liberal democratic

Verfassungspatriotismus sometime around the late 1970s in West Germany3

and the emergence of a postmodern, consumer capitalist culture

in eastern Germany since 19944 do not conform to mainstream

political culture theory’s expectations of gradual, only generational

change. To be sure, continuity, if not inertia, characterizes much of

politics, even in Germany. Still, to be of theoretical value, the concept

of political culture must be able not only to admit but to

account for change.

Open access

Editorial

‘But No One Died’: A Brief Reflection on Place and Time

Edited by Christine McCourt

://grenfellactiongroup.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/kctmo-playing-with-fire/ . Madden , D. ( 2017 ), ‘ Editorial: A Catastrophic Event ’, City: Analysis of Urban Trends, Culture, Theory, Policy, Action 21 , no. 1 : 1 – 5 , doi.org/10.1080/13604813.2017.1348743 . McKee , M. ( 2017

Free access

Introduction

The Generative Power of Political Emotions

Mette-Louise Johansen, Therese Sandrup, and Nerina Weiss

– 46 . Solomon , R. C. 1984 . “ Getting angry: The Jamesian theory of emotion in anthropology .” In Culture theory: Essays on mind, self , and emotion edited by Richard A. Shweder and Robert A. LeVine , 238 – 254 . Cambridge

Open access

Living Through and Living On?

Participatory Humanitarian Architecture in the Jarahieh Refugee Settlement, Lebanon

Riccardo Luca Conti, Joana Dabaj, and Elisa Pascucci

Makings, Politics and Aesthetics of ‘Social’ Architecture and Design .” City: Analysis of Urban Trends, Culture, Theory, Policy, Action 21 ( 6 ): 769 – 778 . Rokem , Jonathan , Sara Fregonese , Adam Ramadan , Elisa Pascucci , Gilad Rosen

Restricted access

Eli Thorkelson, Guy Redden, Christopher Newfield, Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich, and Marie-Pierre Moreau

testing, but eventually ceded to international influences in line with world culture theory. Aure?n and Joshi’s chapter, however, stands out as it shows how the Finnish have built their national ‘brand’ of educational excellence in international PISA

Restricted access

Therese Sandrup

Jamesian theory of Emotion in Anthropology .” In Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and Emotion , ed. Richard A. Schweder and Robert A. LeVine , 238 – 254 . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Svenkerud , Herbert . 2004 . Engelsk