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Cyborgian Salariats

Rationalization and the White-Collar Worker in Sasha Stone's “Hundred-Horsepower Office”

Stephanie Bender

in its very remnants. Matthew Biro (2009) suggests the anachronistic term cyborg as one more fitting to these Weimar constructions, and I understand Stone's images of the salariats at work in this photo essay as suggestive of the hybridity of

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Challenging Binaries in Posthuman Worlds

An Analysis of Lu Yang's The Great Adventure of Material World

Jori Snels

the plot of The Great Adventure and the Buddhist concepts on which it is based and will then analyze how the work reconceptualizes the notion of subjectivity through three key posthuman concepts: the cyborg, post-gender, and death. Material World

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When One Becomes Two

Man–Machine Hybridization in Urban Cyclists with Broken Bikes

Lou Therese Brandner

to mind Donna Haraway's cyborgs, 4 human–technology entities navigating urban space, creating new forms of subjectivity. Considering these findings and drawing on literature on human–machine hybridity, I wanted to analyze further the ways in which

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Editorial

Screening Disability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

This issue of Screen Bodies features a Screen Shots section focusing on screening disability, including essays on new disability documentaries, vacillation and the dis/abled male body—especially as it plays out in Fred Zimmerman’s 1950 film The Men—and questions of masquerade and representations of Richard III on stage and screen. It also includes general essays on “undoing” gender through complicity and subversion, the rise in the importance of the haptic in Japanese society, culture, and filmmaking in the 1920s, and an investigation of uncertainty and the “generosity paradox” with regard to gender, sexuality, and ability in cyborg cinema.

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Sounds of the Apocalypse: Preserving Cold War Memories in Ulrich Horstmann's Radio Play Die Bunkermann-Kassette

Gerrit K. Roessler

This article examines Ulrich Horstmann's science fiction radio play Die Bunkermann-Kassette (The Bunker Man Cassette, 1979), in which the author frames fears and anxieties surrounding a potential nuclear conflict during the Cold War as apocalyptic self-annihilation of the human race. Radio, especially radio drama, had a unique role in capturing the historical imaginaries and traumatic experiences surrounding this non-event. Horstmann's radio drama and the titular cassette tape become sound artifacts that speak to the technological contexts of their time, while their acoustic content carries the past sounds into the present. In the world of the play, these artifacts are presented in a museum of the future, which uses the possibilities of science fictional imagination and speculation to create prosthetic memories of the Cold War. The article suggests that these memories are cyborg memories, because the listener is a fully integrated component of radio technology that makes these memories and recollections of imagined events possible in the first place.

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Replication, Regeneration or Organic Birth

The Clone in Deryn Rees-Jones' Quiver and Donna Haraway's 'A Cyborg Manifesto'

Zoë Brigley

Rees-Jones' Quiver and Donna Haraway's 'A Cyborg Manifesto' explore how different mythologies of being can emancipate women from and create a dialogue with ordinary female reproduction. Haraway and Rees-Jones use advances in reproductive and mechanical technologies to imagine new modes of being which are not simply products of the imagination, but a recycling of images and debates of concern to women and feminists. In Test-Tube Women: What Future for Motherhood?, Rita Arditti, Renate Duelli Klein and Shelley Minden ask a pertinent question: '[e]ach time a new technological development is hailed the same question arises: is this liberation or oppression in a new guise?' Both Haraway and Rees-Jones explore the rise of new technologies in relation to gender and maternity and gauge the emancipatory or oppressive possibilities.

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Editorial

Heike Weber and Gijs Mom

The final months of 2014 have seen many critical events in respect to mobility: Apple introduced its Apple Watch, a cyborg technology that adds a novel, substantially corporeal layer to our “always on” connectedness—what Sherry Turkle has termed the “tethered self.”1 Moreover, it is said to revolutionize mobile paying systems, and it might finally implement mobile body monitoring techniques into daily life.2 Ebola is terrorizing Africa and frightening the world; its outbreak and spread is based on human mobility, and researchers are calling for better control and quantifi cation of human mobility in the affected regions to contain the disease.3 Even its initial spread from animals to humans may have had its origin in human transgressions beyond traditional habitats, by intruding into insular bush regions and using the local fruit bats as food. Due to global mobility patterns, the viral passenger switched transport modes, from animal to airplane. On the other hand, private space fl ight suff ered two serious setbacks in just one week when the Antares rocket of Orbital Sciences, with supplies for the International Space Station and satellites on board, exploded, and shortly after, SpaceShipTwo crashed over the Mojave Desert. Th ese catastrophic failures ignited wide media discussion on the challenges, dangers, and signifi cance of space mobility, its ongoing commercialization and privatization, and, in particular, plans for future manned space travel for “tourists.”4

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Review

Saturn Sigourney Rage

@D@,” Steinbock engages with Donna Haraway's conceptualization of the trans cyborg. “Gender-chimeric cyborgs represent the actual and virtual manifestation of rapidly shifting multiplicities, coded switch-forms that embody the aesthetics of change” (107), states

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Toward an Ecology of Disentanglement

Jozef Keulartz

the work of Donna Haraway and Bruno Latour. From Cyborgs to Companion Species What transhumanism and posthumanism share, according to Francesca Ferrando (2013) , is the notion of technogenesis, the idea that the human species is defined by its

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Artificial Intelligence

Faith in Machine or Man?

Jan Martijn Meij

Lovelock (JL)—and many other tech utopians—dismiss the doomsday predictions and argue that cyborgs are the planet's best hope in undoing the constant heating of the Earth. Others, such as Bill McKibben (BM) are more skeptical and argue that not only is this