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Angelina Lukina

Translator : Tatiana Argounova-Low

For the Yakut 1 people residing in the region of Sakha (Yakutia), 2 northeastern Siberia, dances have always been a constituent and important part of their tradition and believed to have magical potency. Dances also represented a certain worldview

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Dancing on the Threshold

A Cultural Concept for Conditions of Being Far from Salvation

Gregor Rohmann

“Dancing mania” and “St. Vitus dance” were culturally formed illness concepts that enabled late medieval people in the Rhine area to act out states of liminality. The semiotics of these trace back to ancient Platonic cosmology, which had been transmitted into medieval theology by late antique Neoplatonism. In this article the iteration of these motifs especially through the early and high Middle Ages is scrutinized. When “dancing mania” emerged in the fourteenth century it was thus neither an early case of mass hysteria nor a particular form of religious deviance, as is still assumed frequently.

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Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

Catching Ghosts Bill T. Jones, writes digital artist Paul Kaiser (2003) , “danced like a man possessed—possessed in turn by eight or nine distinct selves.” Improvising on the unforgiving concrete floor of a motion-capture studio, Jones

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The Changing Portrayal of Dancers in Egyptian Films

Three Roles in the Career of Tahia Carioca (1946, 1958 and 1972)

Carolina Bracco

The first news regarding female Egyptian dancers came through European traveller tales. Many artists travelled to Egypt in the nineteenth century and managed to see dancers or searched specifically for them, making these women one of the most

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Community and Creativity in the Classroom

An Experiment in the Use of the Guest Interview, Focus Group Interviews and Learning Journals in the Teaching and Learning of the Anthropology of Modern Dance

Jonathan Skinner and Kirk Simpson

This article assesses the experimental teaching and learning of an anthropology module on 'modern dance'. It reviews the teaching and learning of the modern dances (lecture, observation, embodied practice, guest interview), paying attention to the triangulation of investigation methods (learning journal, examination, self-esteem survey, focus group interview). Our findings suggest that—in keeping with contemporary participatory educational approaches—students prefer guest interviews and 'performances of understanding' for teaching and learning, and that focus groups and learning journals were the preferred research methods for illuminating the students' teaching and learning experience.

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Between the Lines

Communication with People with Dementia in Creative Movement Sessions

Elisabeth Zeindlinger

This article explores the various ways of communicating with people with dementia during dance sessions and how creative movement can support people to create meaning in the moment. The following did not originate in conventional research but is a reflection on my work as a dancer in healthcare. I took notes about my observations for my own development. After some time I felt the need to dig deeper and search for theories affiliated to my thoughts and find out more about dementia.

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“Farmers Don't Dance”

The Construction of Gender in a Rural Scottish School

Fiona G. Menzies and Ninetta Santoro

walks towards Jack's desk to collect something. Jack is standing in front of his desk. They meet awkwardly; she jokes about them doing a ‘dance’ as they try to shuffle past each other. He makes a comment about her not being a dancer. Anna (smiling): ‘I

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Dances with Heads

Parasitic Mimesis and the Government of Savagery in Colonial East Timor

Ricardo Roque

Southeast Asia. These rites went by the name of ‘dance’ or ‘feast of the heads’ ( festa das cabeças , in Portuguese) in the colonial discourse of the time, or by the name of the lorosa’e (rising sun) in its widespread indigenous designation in the Tetum

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Skating toward Americanization

The Transformation of Katarina Witt throughout the 1980s

Wesley Lim

At the 1987 World Figure Skating Championship, Katarina Witt skated to instrumental music from West Side Story playing the role of Maria. But how could her performance to Broadway show tunes be in line with SED ideology? Through histoire croisée— establishing multiple intersections with different cultures and tracing their continuing effects—this article examines how Witt’s, her coach Jutta Müller’s and choreographer Rudy Suchy’s privileged exposure to Western culture through dance, music, film, experiences abroad, and other skaters’ choreography and costuming inspired reappropriated manifestations through an East German lens into the packaging of Witt’s skating programs in the 1980s. Using television broadcasts, I analyze the gradual to overt Americanization of her programs as her government loosened its grips by granting her more artistic freedom.

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Dancing in Solidarity and Dissent

JCM 2015, Wuppertal

Mark L. Solomon

longer the outsider I had been at school, I was embraced – quite literally – in the joyous group dances that accompanied our Sabbath meals, our monthly farbrengens (the mystical get-togethers with vodka, Hasidic singing and uplifting spiritual stories