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Smita Yadav

Sites of pilgrimage and heritage tourism are often sites of social inequality and volatility that are impaired by hostilities between historical, ethnic, and competing religious discourses of morality, personhood, and culture, as well as between imaginaries of nationalism and citizenship. Often these pilgrim sites are much older in national and global history than the actual sovereign nation-state in which they are located. Pertinent issues to do with finance—such as regimes of taxation, livelihoods, and the wealth of regional and national economies—underscore these sites of worship. The articles in this special issue engage with prolix travel arrangement, accommodation, and other aspects of heritage tourism in order to understand how intangible aspects of such tourism proceed. But they also relate back to when and how these modern infrastructures transformed the pilgrimage and explore what the emerging discourses and practices were that gave newer meanings to neoliberal pilgrimages. The different case studies presented in this issue analyze the impact of these journeys on the pilgrims’ own subjectivities—especially with regard to the holy sites being situated in their imaginations of historical continuity and discontinuity and with regard to their transformative experiences of worship—using both modern and traditional infrastructures.

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Florian Wöltering

The paper presents the state of research on war-related tourism. Changing ideas about why tourists choose to visit war museums and battlefields, and how those spaces have shifted, are presented. The piece makes it obvious that further research on the social relevance of war-related tourism is needed. An outline of the opportunities and limits of several alternative concepts - thanatourism, atrocity tourism and dark tourism - is given. Finally, the text ends by discussing the intersection of the history of mobility with war tourism scholarship.

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Shades of Darkness

Silence, Risk and Fear among Tourists and Nepalis during Nepal's Civil War

Sharon Hepburn

The conflict between the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and the Nepalese state, from 1996 until 2006, resulted in thousands of "disappeared" and dead Nepalis, and, especially after 9/11, a sharp decline in tourism in Nepal. Yet the tourists who came had good journeys. Based on ethnographic research, this article explores how these two worlds—of tourism, and the darkness of war, variously experienced—coexisted in the winter of 2002 in the lakeside resort of Pokhara. The article describes how the culture of silence that emerged during the war permeated interactions between Nepalis and visitors, and that there are shades of darkness as well as shades of fear. Situations are not black and white and people's experiences are contingent on contexts and backgrounds that are diverse and complex. Complementing studies of dark tourism, that is tourism about darkness, this is a study of tourism in darkness.

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The “Mangle” of Human Practice

Museu do Amanhã’s Artistic Staging as a Socioscientific Narrative on Climate Change

Rodanthi Tzanelli

exhibition is divided into five areas, each representing one epochal segment: Cosmos, Earth, Anthropocene, Now, and Tomorrow. Each segment adds to an ultrapessimistic “script” of left-wing undertones resembling a particular version of “dark tourism” as

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Chia-ling Lai

led to the rise of “dark tourism.” 2 Neither as sensationally traumatic as Auschwitz’s termination concentration camp in Poland nor as aesthetic as the forms of many modern Jewish museums in Germany and the United States, the Terezín Memorial in the

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Jamie McMenamin, Lauri Hyers, Jeroen Nawijn and Aviva Sinervo

forms a contrast to research on dark tourism. They assert that the work in their book has “positive, optimistic and potentially personally rewarding tone” (2). This to me suggests that the editors believe that dark tourism experiences mostly trigger