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Decolonising Borders

Re-imagining Strangeness and Spaces

John Sodiq Sanni

also propose a re-imagination of the other that emerges from the decolonisation of borders in Africa. This re-imagination seeks to debunk what I consider a colonial conception of the borders that I argue has remained within African understanding of

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Colonising ‘Free’ Will

A Critique of Political Decolonisation in Ghana

Bernard Forjwuor

decolonisation, if also colonialism, are heavily contested in postcolonial scholarships ( Delavignette 1964 ; Nkrumah 1965 ; Nkrumah 1970 ; Nkrumah 1973 ; Mudimbe 1988 ; Mbembe 2001 ; Olúfémi Táíwò 2010 ; Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2013 ), almost all critical

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Portrait of the Artist as Colonised Subject

Fanon, Rancière and the Struggle Toward Decolonisation on the Aesthetic Front

Matthias Pauwels

This article engages with Frantz Fanon’s writings on different responses by artists among colonised peoples to the fact of their colonisation. Fanon develops a dialectical account in which an initial stage of assimilation of Western techniques and paradigms is followed by a phase of immersion in African artistic traditions. These two phases then function as prelude to a third, combative stage which is presented as the most efficacious and authentic way for artists to play their part in decolonisation. The article problematises the temporal logic and implicit hierarchies of Fanon’s account. It does so by using Jacques Rancière’s redemptive reading of early working class mobilisations in 1830s and 1840s France, prior to the advent of Marxian proletarian politics, as a counterpoint. The article here finds a different, more affirmative, nondialectical and non-historicist way of evaluating the liberatory potential of artistic practices by the colonised prior to combative decolonisation.

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Pascah Mungwini

‘fundamental concepts by means of which whole ranges of issues [from ethics, religion, politics, economics, and many other significant areas of life] are formulated and discussed’ ( Wiredu 1998: 20 ). My position is that Africa needs intellectual decolonisation

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The Economics of Decolonisation

Institutions, Education and Elite Formation

Nicola Viegi

education systems that the colonisers ingrained in their African colonies. It will argue that colonial education had a significant impact on the process of decolonisation and the following postcolonial history and it still represents a significant obstacle

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Activist Anthropology with the Haudenosaunee

Theoretical and Practical Insights from the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign

Brooke Hansen and Jack Rossen

activist anthropology and to see the intersections between this form of positioned anthropology with decolonisation theories, indigenous anthropology and the pedagogies of engagement. We advocate for theoretical shifts that open spaces for indigenous voices

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Empire and Economics

Decolonising Colonialism and Its Legacies in Africa

Edited by Lawrence Hamilton

In order effectively to decolonise Africa we need to understand better the economic and political effects of colonialism in and on Africa today. To achieve that understanding we need to look beyond the tired, well-trodden themes in African

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Capacity-building projects in African higher education

Issues of coloniality in international academic collaboration

Hanne Kirstine Adriansen and Lene Møller Madsen

This article studies issues of coloniality in so-called capacity-building projects between universities in Africa and Scandinavia. Even fifty years after independence, the African higher education landscape is a product of the colonial powers and subsequent uneven power relations, as argued by a number of researchers. The uneven geography and power of knowledge exist also between countries that were not in a direct colonial relationship, which the word coloniality implies. Based on interviews with stakeholders and on our own experiences of capacity-building projects, this article examines how such projects affect teaching, learning, curriculum, research methodology and issues of quality enhancement. We analyse the dilemmas and paradoxes involved in this type of international collaboration and conclude by offering ways to decolonise capacity-building projects.

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Rihab Azar

Abstract

Can collaborative, transparent, and open-ended inquiries empower social activism and grassroot change? In my response to “Listening with Displacement,” I argue that it can and that it should. In an age full of unhelpful and dangerous narratives of displacement, I suggest that anthropologists are very well-positioned to take their role a step further to facilitate social understanding and cohesion as they collaboratively explore and create points of contact with and for their subjects.

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Whose Reality Counts?

Emergent Dalitbahujan Anthropologists

Reddi Sekhara Yalamala

Abstract

The low caste, Dalit and Tribal social movements in India have reconfigured the fabric of Indian society in significant ways over the past decade. Likewise, the movement of these same groups into anthropology, a discipline previously dominated in India by upper-caste intellectuals, has created a dynamic force for change in the academy. At a time when India is vying with the global economic powers for supremacy, the people severely affected are low caste, Dalits and Tribal peoples, who see their lands being lost and their lifestyles in rapid transformation. Some from these same groups are also witnessing some of their daughters and sons pursuing higher studies and entering into the social sciences. The entry of these young scholars not only challenges the caste-based status quo in the academy, but it also forces these scholars to question their own position in relation to these social movements and in relation to Indian society more broadly.