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Pleasure and Dementia

On Becoming an Appreciating Subject

Annelieke Driessen

Pleasure in dementia care Dementia is one of the most feared diseases of our times (Pin et al., in Van Gorp and Vercruysse 2012: 1274 ). Emotionally charged metaphors, in both lay and medical discourse, are illustrative of this: they present

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A World of Touch in a No-Touch Pandemic

Living with Dementia in a Care Facility during COVID-19

Cristina Douglas

visits to Garden Views Care Home. But during my fieldwork, I developed a warm friendship with Jean despite her significant loss of memory and apparent loss of language. She has been living for a few years now with very advanced dementia at Garden Views

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Introduction

For an Anthropology of Cognitive Disability

Patrick McKearney and Tyler Zoanni

reckon with cognitive differences such as dementia, autism and brain injury that can be disabling in certain social settings. We do not take these categorizations as neutral descriptors of a fixed reality. Instead, following the Social Model, we

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Between the Lines

Communication with People with Dementia in Creative Movement Sessions

Elisabeth Zeindlinger

This article explores the various ways of communicating with people with dementia during dance sessions and how creative movement can support people to create meaning in the moment. The following did not originate in conventional research but is a reflection on my work as a dancer in healthcare. I took notes about my observations for my own development. After some time I felt the need to dig deeper and search for theories affiliated to my thoughts and find out more about dementia.

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Lawrence Cohen

This chapter engages both the irony of old age and the old age of irony. Building on an understanding of senility and dementia as reg- isters of voice, it makes three principal assertions: first, that a form of listeningwe might term ironic may allow for less depersonaliza- tion of those we hear to be senile; second, that an ironic relationship to the biologization of everythingavoids a return to nature/culture binaries; and third, that irony for both Plato and for Vico is framed as a temporal register of the aging of things. Using Socrates as an example of a figure whose aging is outside of nature yet under the law, the essay explores the tension between living with the difficult elderly and seeking to displace them in order to maintain the time- lessness of culture.

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Andrew Dawson

This biographical and, in part, phenomenological anthropology of older people in post-industrial England illuminates a local and generationally specific communitarian critique of and form of resistance against the process of individualisation. Rather than presenting communitarianism conventionally as an abstract political ideology or set of ideas about locality, it is conceptualised as emerging from and being reinforced by experiences of ageing, especially bodily ageing. It these respects, the article responds positively to Tatjana Thelen and Cati Coe’s call to take the anthropology of ageing out of its current condition of relative intellectual marginality, by recognising ageing and its related care arrangements as key structuring features within societies and political organisation and by treating them as a window onto understanding broad-scale social and political processes.

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Learning in Collaborative Moments

Practising Relating Differently with Dementia in Dialogue Meetings

Silke Hoppe, Laura Vermeulen, Annelieke Driessen, Els Roding, Marije de Groot, and Kristine Krause

framework of the Partnership on Long-Term Care and Dementia in the Netherlands. The partnership was set up in 2012 by Anne-Mei The and was funded by the Dutch Ministry of Health, the Gieskes-Strijbis Foundation, the care organisation Cordaan, and the

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Simone Toji

Abstract

This is a story about the disturbed perception of an elderly person of Polish origin who is living through the effects of dementia. Throughout his discontinuous flashes of consciousness, the text plays with senses of alterity and the invisibility of different groups who lived or are still living in Bom Retiro, a neighborhood in the city of São Paulo. The story refers symbolically to a sense of “discovery” of new migration patterns in the city when south-south migration flows became prominent. The existence of different groups of nationalities is also represented in the narrative by the characters’ use of terms borrowed from various languages. While Polish is recovered by the main character in order to explore a sense of belonging, words in Italian, Spanish, or Portuguese are appropriated by him and other figures to establish a certain degree of alterity in relation to the migrants who are native speakers of these three languages.

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Henglien Lisa Chen and David Orr

2, a potpourri of topics is explained by reference to technologies that support a healthy lifestyle and wellbeing. These include reports of empirical studies (assistive technology in self-management and behavioural change, living well with dementia

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Andrew Dawson and Simone Dennis

this issue consider the experiences of a range of workplaces and workers: dementia carers; palliative carers; birth doulas; sex workers; traders; domestic workers and professionals who have transformed increasingly into domestic workers because of