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“There's Something About HER

Realities of Black Girlhood in a Settler State

Kandice A. Sumner

. This was my existence. I attended a predominantly white suburban public school from the age of five until I was seventeen through the longest running desegregation program in America—the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity (METCO). Founded

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Breaking Barriers and Coded Language

Watching Politics of Race at the Ballpark

Thomas D. Bunting

Drawing on recent literature on political spectatorship, I show how sport, and baseball in particular, can both illuminate and shape American politics. Following the history of racial segregation and immigrant assimilation in baseball, one sees that it mirrors American race politics on the whole. I argue that Jackie Robinson and the desegregation of baseball changed both American politics and the horizons within which citizens think. Although it is tempting to focus on this positive and emergent moment, I argue that for the most part, looking at the history of race in baseball shows instead coded language that reinforces racial stereotypes. This example of baseball and race shows how powerful spectatorship can be in the democratic world. Spectatorship need not be passive but can be an important sphere of activity in democratic life.

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Transitory Citizens

Contentious Housing Practices in Contemporary South Africa

Kerry Ryan Chance

This article examines the informal housing practices that the urban poor use to construct, transform, and access citizenship in contemporary South Africa. Following the election of Nelson Mandela in 1994, the provision of formalized housing for the urban poor has become a key metric for 'non-racial' political inclusion and the desegregation of apartheid cities. Yet, shack settlements—commemorated in liberation histories as apartheid-era battlegrounds—have been reclassified as 'slums', zones that are earmarked for clearance or development. Evictions from shack settlements to government emergency camps have been justified under the liberal logic of expanding housing rights tied to citizenship. I argue that the informal housing practices make visible the methods of managing 'slum' populations, as well as an emerging living politics in South African cities.

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Interrogating the Meanings of Dolls

New Directions in Doll Studies

Miriam Forman-Brunell

The articles in this issue demonstrate that dolls are ubiquitous cultural forms central to girlhood and young womanhood. Yet understanding the historical and contemporary significance of dolls is a relatively recent development. Th e age-old trivialization of girls and devaluation of youth cultures led to the customary disregard of dolls as legitimate sources of documentary evidence even among scholars. It was not until the late nineteenth century that changing notions of childhood first gave rise to research on children, and a new appreciation of the meanings of play. In 1896, G. Stanley Hall, the founder of the child-study movement, a professor of psychology, and president of Clark University, co-authored with A.C. Ellis the pioneering, “A Study of Dolls,” in which he argued that doll play taught girls key lessons in femininity and maternity. Although Hall argued that “the educational value of toys was enormous” (160), dolls once again lapsed into scholarly obscurity. It was during the late 1930s that Mamie Phipps Clark, then a Master’s student in psychology, used dolls to study the self-esteem of African American children. Th e subsequent doll studies she conducted with her husband, Kenneth Clark, played a role in the 1954 landmark desegregation decision, yet failed to perpetuate doll research. It was on the (high) heels of Barbie who debuted a few years after Brown v. Board of Education, that dolls became the focus of a lively (and still on-going) discourse among parents and pundits but not among academics about their social meanings in the lives of girls.

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Heritage or hate?

A pedagogical guide to the confederate flag in post-race America

Cameron D. Lippard

remove a confederate flag from the top of its capitol building in Columbia even though the flag had been there since 1962 in opposition to federally-mandated desegregation. However, the flag remained displayed on the public grounds of the South Carolina

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Remixing and Reimagining the Early Childhood School Experiences of Brilliant Black Boys

Brian L. Wright and Donna Y. Ford

examine the long-standing underrepresentation of Black students 2 in gifted education by challenging the identification, recruitment, and retention of these students (see Ford 2013 for a more extensive review of the desegregation of gifted education

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Understanding through Performance Black Boston

A City Connects

PJ Carlino

first casualty of the American Revolutionary War, to protests at City Hall Plaza over school desegregation in the 1970s. A nearby interactive video exhibit introduces visitors to the families and neighborhoods of many of the black Bostonian children who

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Zootopia

Everything in Motion

Clio Andris and Juan Ruescas

course, he can work in the central business district (CBD)—a central node that joins the climate-sensitive animal kingdoms for the daily nine-to-five grind. Total separation and desegregation of the differences would be simple; as easy as sprawl. However

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Eyes wide shut

Il/legality and solidarity in housing struggles in (post)socialist Sofia and Caracas

Mariya Ivancheva and Stefan Krastev

as potential proletarians. Their goal was to “erase the cultural difference of the Roma and transform them into socialist workers” ( Grekova et al. 2008: 53 ). The way to do that was to desegregate “Gypsy neighborhoods, whose bad living conditions

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“Defining Ourselves for Ourselves”

Black Girls Conceptualize Black Girlhood Online

Cierra Kaler-Jones

students whenever authorities were not present, Jarvis Givens (2021) tells us. During the school desegregation movement, Black girls as young as 6 claimed their rights ( Devlin 2018 ). Beyond the scope of the colonial project of K-12 schooling, Black