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Noncitizens’ Rights

Moving beyond Migrants’ Rights

Sin Yee Koh

oftentimes nontransparent) acceptance that selectively includes or excludes them as rightful members of their host countries. As Patricia Landolt and Luin Goldring (2016: n.p.) write: “Variable and dynamic frames of deservingness mediate all interactions

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Creating the State Locally through Welfare Provision

Two Mayors, Two Welfare Regimes in Rural Hungary

Gyöngyi Schwarcz and Alexandra Szőke

This article examines the ways in which decentralized welfare provision is utilized by local state officials, particularly mayors, to (re)create local belonging along notions of deservingness. Comparing the organization of three forms of benefits in two villages, we demonstrate that local practices of welfare embody different state images that are created and negotiated both through the regulatory power of local state actors and through their various interactions and embeddedness in local social relations. Our empirical material highlights that the specificities of positions held by elected local officials and their accorded responsibilities, in addition to the position of their locality in the broader socio-spatial landscape of the country, are of great importance. All these largely influence the ways in which state images are formed and materialize in redistributive practice.

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“Illegality,“ health problems, and return migration

Cases from a migrant sending community in Puebla, Mexico

Alison Elizabeth Lee

English abstract: This article examines several cases of undocumented workers who returned to their hometown in Mexico because of unresolved health problems they suffered in the US. Their “illegal“ status complicated the prospect of a full recovery and, therefore, played an important role in their decision to return to Mexico. Access to medical services, the preference to remain invisible to the state, demanding and dangerous working conditions, lack of worker benefits, low pay and separation from family members were important factors contributing to their health problems. Interviews with migrants highlight the contradictions between full integration into the exploitative economic system and exclusion from health care. Data was collected from 2003 to 2005 and from 2011 to 2012 using ethnographic methods and in-depth interviews in a rural town in Mexico and New York City, the principal destination of the migrants from the town.

Spanish abstract: Este artículo examina varios casos de trabajadores indocumentados quienes retornaron a su pueblo natal en México, debido a problemas de salud no resueltos que sufrieron en los Estados Unidos. Su estatus "ilegal" complicó las perspectivas de una completa recuperación y, por lo tanto, jugó un papel importante en su decisión de regresar a México. El acceso a los servicios médicos, la preferencia de permanecer invisibles para el Estado, las exigentes y peligrosas condiciones de trabajo, la falta de beneficios laborales, los bajos salarios y la separación de los miembros de la familia, fueron factores importantes que contribuyeron a sus problemas de salud. Las entrevistas con los migrantes destacan las contradicciones entre la plena integración en el sistema de explotación económica y la exclusión de la atención sanitaria. Se recogieron datos de 2003 a 2005 y desde 2011 hasta 2012 usando métodos etnográficos y entrevistas en profundidad en un pueblo rural en México y en la ciudad de Nueva York, el principal destino de los migrantes.

French abstract: Cet article examine le cas de plusieurs travailleurs sans papiers forcés de retourner dans leur village natal au Mexique en raison des problèmes de santé subis et qu'ils n'ont pas pu résoudre aux États-Unis. Leur statut «illégal» a compliqué la perspective d'un rétablissement complet et a par conséquent joué un rôle important dans leur décision de retourner au Mexique. Le non accès aux services médicaux, le souci constant de rester invisible face aux autorités locales, les conditions de travail exigeantes et dangereuses, l'impossibilité d'avoir accès aux avantages sociaux traditionnellement réservés aux travailleurs, les salaires bas, ainsi que la séparation d'avec les membres de leur famille sont autant de facteurs qui contribuent à leurs problèmes de santé ou à l'aggravation de ceux-ci. Les entretiens menés avec les migrants, me ent en évidence les contradictions entre l'intégration complète dans le système d'exploitation économique et de l'exclusion aux soins de santé. Les données présentées dans ce e analyse, ont été recueillies de 2003 à 2005 et de 2011 à 2012 en utilisant des méthodes ethnographiques et des entrevues en profondeur dans un village rural au Mexique et à New York, principale destination des migrants en provenance de ce e zone.

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Erica L. Fraser

With the onset of the Cold War and a new nuclear world order, Soviet physicists found themselves at the nexus of scientific research and weapons development. This article investigates the subjectivity of these physicists as an issue of masculinity. Influenced by Connell's models of subordinated, complicit, and hegemonic masculinity, the article finds that the stories nuclear physicists tell about their research in the 1950s are inconsistent and shifting, with the narrators simultaneously remembering unfreedom and privilege. They tell of being conscripted to military work against their will but then enjoying (and deserving) the resulting power, all while maintaining strong homosocial networks in the laboratory predicated on excluding women. Evidence from personal narratives provides unique insight into these multiple masculinities and the way the authors position themselves as (masculinized) Cold War subjects.

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Releasing a Tradition

Diasporic Epistemology and the Decolonized Curriculum

Jovan Scott Lewis

Abstract

With educational campaigns that ask ‘Why isn’t my professor Black?’ and ‘Why is my curriculum white?’ there is a push directed towards institutions to provide an education that is diverse, inclusive and representative of the liberal ideals that many promote. This is being done primarily through a discourse of decolonization. In this article, I consider the formulation for a truly decolonized curriculum by first assessing what constitutes a ‘colonial’ education, especially one that is deserving of decolonization. I then discuss the parameters of educational decolonization, by thinking with decolonial and anti-colonial thinkers, to assess the tenability of a decolonized curriculum. Ultimately, I suggest what forms a decolonized curriculum might take by drawing on diaspora theory and by describing broader programmatic requirements within the framework of the Black Radical Tradition that offers decolonial epistemologies as a broad praxis for education.

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Confined Live(r)s

Self-Infliction and Arbitrary Survival in the German Transplant System

Julia Rehsmann

This article traces the trope of self-infliction for the moral economy of liver transplantation. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in Germany, I discuss the trope of self-infliction to explore intimate uncertainties that people with an alcoholic liver disease face when looking for medical care. I claim that the moralising trope of self-infliction plays a significant role in considerations about who is deserving of a liver transplant and a ‘second chance’. As access to transplantation becomes a life-and-death matter when livers fail, I see the trope of self-infliction as a tool for triaging lives for liver transplantation. Moreover, I claim that the trope of self-infliction, with its emphasis on self-responsibility, has a gendered dimension that puts women with an alcoholic liver disease under particular moral scrutiny. Furthermore, I demonstrate how this moralising trope shapes regulatory practices, like the ‘six-month abstinence rule’, which consequently confine livers and thus, eventually, confine lives.

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The Value of Nation

Bureaucratic Practices and the Lived Experience in the French Naturalization Process

Sarah Mazouz

Drawing on ethnographical observations made in the Naturalization Office of a prefecture of the Paris region, and on interviews carried out with bureaucrats and French citizens who have been naturalized, this article examines both the institutional process of granting citizenship as well as its impact on subjectivities. It investigates the assumptions and broad judgments that underlie the granting of French citizenship to see how norms and values linked to this procedure circulate between bureaucrats and applicants. It focuses on the idea of “deservingness,” linked to the act of being granted French citizenship, to determine how bureaucrats from the Naturalization Office and French naturalized citizens differently appropriate this notion. By addressing the articulated difference between bureaucratic practice and lived experience, this article aims to highlight the political, moral, and ethical dimensions at stake in the procedure of making foreigners into French citizens.

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Tenuous Belonging

Citizenship and Democracy in Mozambique

Jason Sumich

This article examines changing ideas of who constitutes a 'deserving' and 'full' citizen in Mozambique, from independence in 1975 to the present. I argue that the leadership of the ruling Frelimo Party attempted to occupy a position above society where it could determine the practices and behaviors that made one a loyal citizen and, conversely, those that made one an 'alien' or enemy. The adoption of liberal democracy in 1990 undermined the party's right to define what a 'true' or 'good' Mozambican is, but not the underlying structural grammar. Thus, the meaning of citizenship is increasingly a floating signifier. To be designated an 'outsider' is to be an enemy, but it is no longer clear who has the power to define who is a 'true' Mozambican and who is not.

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Contingent Statehood

Clientelism and Civic Engagement as Relational Modalities in Contemporary Bosnia and Herzegovina

Larissa Vetters

This article analyzes clientelism and civic engagement as two relational modalities adopted by the residents of Mostar to obtain state-funded housing assistance in the face of rapid political transformation, economic insecurity, and post-conflict reconstruction. Couched in historical and contemporary discourses of deservingness and harking back to spatial imaginaries that evolved during the socialist era, both modalities converge in the notion of raseljeni, a post-war administrative category denoting an internally displaced person. Despite their apparent differences, the ultimate goal of both modalities is to establish sustainable channels of communication and productive relations with state authorities. Such relational modalities not only facilitate citizens' access to public resources, but also lend continuity and coherence to a fragmented state apparatus. In the process, they give rise to distinct political subjectivities and notions of political community.

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Seeking Recognition, Becoming Citizens

Achievements and Grievances among Former Combatants from Three Wars

Johanna Söderström

How do former combatants understand and make themselves into a citizen category? Through exploring the life narratives of former combatants from three different wars (Namibia, Colombia, and United States–Vietnam), this article locates similarities in the claims for recognition. The achievements or the grievances associated with the war and their homecoming made them deserving of special recognition from the state, the country, or other veterans. These claims situate these veterans in a political landscape, where they are called upon to mend and affirm the relation with the state, achieve recognition from society, and defend their fellows, which inform their citizenship practices, as it shaped their political mobilization and perceived political status. Through seeking recognition, they affirm their role as citizens.