Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • "digital return" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

After the Return

Digital Repatriation and the Circulation of Indigenous Knowledge Workshop Report

Joshua A. Bell, Kimberly Christen, and Mark Turin

On 19 January 2012, the workshop After the Return: Digital Repatriation and the Circulation of Indigenous Knowledge was held at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. With support from the National Science Foundation and the Smithsonian’s Understanding the American Experience and Valuing World Cultures Consortia, this workshop brought together twenty-eight international participants for a debate around what happens to digital materials after they are returned to communities (however such communities are conceived, bounded, and lived). The workshop provided a unique opportunity for a critical debate about the very idea of digital return in all of its problematic manifestations, from the linguistic to the legal, as indigenous communities, archives, libraries, and museums work through the terrain of digital collaboration, return, and sharing. What follows is a report on the workshop’s presentations and discussions.

Restricted access

Reassembling The Social Organization

Collaboration and Digital Media in (Re)making Boas’s 1897 Book

Aaron Glass, Judith Berman, and Rainer Hatoum

objects or recordings ( Glass and Hennessy forthcoming ). Many global, collective projects of “digital return” ( Bell et al. 2013 ; cf. Hennessy et al. 2013 ; Hogsden and Poulter 2012 ; Holland and Smith 1999 ; Salmond 2012 ) additionally develop

Restricted access

Julia A. King

material (a goal of what has been called “digital repatriation” or “digital return”; see Bell et al. 2013 and Geismar 2014 ). Indeed, the Society for American Archaeology’s Code of Ethics encourages archaeologists to relinquish what it describes as