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Mobile Disasters

Catastrophes in the Age of Manufactured Uncertainty

Steve Matthewman

natural hazards, rapid urbanization and the overconsumption of energy and natural resources threaten to drive risk to dangerous and unpredictable levels with systemic global impacts.” 7 All available evidence shows that disasters are increasing in

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The Democracy of Everyday Life in Disaster

Holding Our Lives in Their Hands

Nancy L. Rosenblum

not dependent on people living nearby for safety or basic needs. Disaster—natural and political upheavals—changes that. Then, “first responders” are not the first. Neighbors hold our lives in their hands. William James captured the scene in an essay

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Susann Baez Ullberg

Flooding in Santa Fe City On 29 April 2003, a disastrous flood occurred in the Argentinean city of Santa Fe. The disaster came to be called by the city’s inhabitants simply “the flood.” The Santafesinos were shocked by the catastrophe. Judging from

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Catherine O'Byrne

The Piper Alpha disaster remains the most significant event in the history of the British North Sea oil industry, yet despite a large range of scholarship on the topic women's experiences of the disaster have not been heard publicly. This article uses oral history testimony to add the private experiences of women who were affected by the disaster to the public experiences of men. The focus of the analysis is on the gendered and political nature of remembrance and the impact that women had on the way that Piper Alpha was commemorated and remembered.

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Dividing Worlds

Tsunamis, Seawalls, and Ontological Politics in Northeast Japan

Andrew Littlejohn

depended on (including the ocean itself). In Minamisanriku, a council of residents, which had been convened to discuss the town's recovery plans, accordingly wrote that they had “seen anew the limits of disaster prevention through hard infrastructure like

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Erin R. Eldridge

taken many forms over the past century in efforts to legitimize an industry wrought with disasters, falling employment levels, human suffering, violence, and widespread environmental destruction ( Eldridge 2015 ). It is only within the past decade

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Holly Thorpe

War, conflict, and natural disasters disrupt millions of lives around the world each year. With fighting and wars raging across the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia, death tolls are “on the rise,” 1 and the United Nations

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Introduction

Ecology and Migration in the Middle East

Soheila Shahshahani

If there is an earthquake or a volcanic eruption, but there is no human being to observe or be affected by it, then this is neither reported nor mentioned. If science looks for it in remnants, it will come up with precisions. Disasters are

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Take My Breath Away

Transformations in the Practices of Relatedness and Intimacy through Australia's 2019–2020 Convergent Crises

Deane Fergie, Rod Lucas, and Morgan Harrington

a key concept for a number of reasons. First, we are convinced that the analysis of complexity and change must be central to the field of catastrophe, crisis, disaster, disruption and emergency studies. We seek to counter the singularity which

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The Complete Story of the Galveston Horror

Trauma, History, and the Great Storm of 1900

Andy Horowitz

This article considers the lurid accounts of looting and lynching that circulated after the 1900 Galveston, Texas, hurricane, the deadliest storm in United States history. Previous accounts of the flood have tended to ignore or subsume these stories in narratives of heroic recovery and progress. But Galvestonians' fantasies of racial violence suggest that the specific catastrophe of the flood was part of the ongoing disaster of racial terror in Texas at the turn of the twentieth century. Understanding disaster as a chronic human process rather than an acute wound from nature reveals that, instead of allowing white Galvestonians to transcend their history of violence against African Americans, the storm seemed to authorize them to further enact and reenact the imposition of suffering.