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Post-disaster Field Trips: Building Expert Knowledge through Itineraries, Memory Sticks, and Cameras

Zuzana Hrdličková

disaster managers in India. The field of disaster management has rapidly expanded in the past three decades as the minimization of human losses due to natural disasters has become a focus of global and national policies. 1 It has commonalities with

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Anatomy of a disaster

The neo-liberal state in Mumbai's 2005 flood

Judith Whitehead

This article discusses the networked forms of governance that have arisen as part of roll-out neo-liberal policies in Mumbai, India, focusing on the flood of 26 July 2005 and its aftermath. The municipal government's inaction during and after the flood is attributed to the decentralization of governance, as well as to cutbacks to public health and basic services in recent years. The rise of competitive urbanism as a part of roll-out neo-liberalism is analyzed as producing gaps in disaster management planning and implementation. The article concludes with a call for a refinanced state and a centralization of municipal bodies under a unified municipal council, seen as necessary to provide the professionalized services required during large-scale emergencies such as floods.

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Whither the people in the ASEAN Community?

Prospects in regional community building above and below the state

See Seng Tan

-building aims and efforts in at least three areas—disaster management, development, and democratization (understood below as human rights)—is of interest here. While the declared objective of a people-focused regionalism receives the most attention in the socio

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Assembling Local Cyclone Knowledge in the Australian Tropics

Hannah Swee

led to a wide network of organizations involved in disaster management in the region that offer a range of information and services. For those working in disaster management, communicating information on cyclones is often perceived to be a challenge

Open access

A State of Relief

Feelings, Affect and Emotions in Instantiating the Malawi State in Disaster Relief

Tanja D. Hendriks

, the disaster management officer of this district in southern Malawi, had to raise his voice to address the civil servants attending the emergency meeting. All of them were exhausted, having spent the entire day doing rapid assessments in areas affected

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Forgetting Flooding? : Post-disaster Livelihood and Embedded Remembrance in Suburban Santa Fe, Argentina

Susann Baez Ullberg

Abstract

Flooding has long been a recurrent problem in the Argentinian city of Santa Fe, mainly affecting the poverty-stricken suburban outskirts. In 2003 one of the worst floods ever occurred, which also affected residents in the middle income sectors who had never been flooded before and who reacted with an extraordinary process of commemoration and protest against the government for its lax disaster management. Paradoxically, most other past disastrous floods in the city’s history seem to dwell in the shadows of social oblivion. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in the years 2004–2011, this article analyzes how local flood memories are made through daily life practices and places in the suburban outskirts, more than through public commemorations, which has implications for vulnerability and risk.

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When “Nature” Strikes: A Sociology of Climate Change and Disaster Vulnerabilities in Asia

Md Saidul Islam and Si Hui Lim

Home to 60 percent of the world's population, Asia accounts for 85 percent of those killed and affected globally by disaster events in 2011. Using an integrated sociological framework comprised of the pressure and release (PAR) model and the double-risk society hypothesis, and drawing on data obtained from the Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT), PreventionWeb, and the IPCC special report on extreme events, this article offers a sociological understanding of disaster development and recovery in Asia. The particular focus is on seven Asian countries, namely, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Thailand, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Rather than treating disasters entirely as “natural” events caused by “violent forces of nature”, we emphasize various ways in which social systems create disaster vulnerability. We argue that existing disaster mitigation and adaptation strategies in Asia that focus almost entirely on the natural and technological aspects of hazards have serious limitations, as they ignore the root causes of disaster vulnerabilities, such as limited access to power and resources. This article therefore recommends a holistic approach to disaster management and mitigation that takes into consideration the various larger social, political, and economic conditions and contexts.

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Editorial

Conal McCarthy

Bruno Brulon Soares on the tragic fire at the Brazilian National Museum, from Dominique Poulot on the high-profile fire at Notre Dame in Paris, and Joanna Cobley on the lessons about resilience and disaster management from post-quake Christchurch, New

Open access

Dividing Worlds

Tsunamis, Seawalls, and Ontological Politics in Northeast Japan

Andrew Littlejohn

(Central Disaster Management Council 2011). Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in Minamisanriku between 2012 and 2016, I argue that the tensions between these positions and projects produced a particular kind of politics in Japan's disaster

Free access

Ten years of re-thinking regions from citizens’ perspectives

Harlan Koff, Carmen Maganda, Philippe De Lombaerde, Edith Kauffer, and Julia Ros Cuellar

three areas: (1) disaster management, (2) development, and (3) democratization (understood here as human rights). Sébastien Dubé then focuses on Latin America. He suggests a functionalist logic through which he analyzes the evolution of the