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Stiles X. Simmons and Karen M. Feathers

(2006) viewed disconnections as an entry point for critical discussions, claiming it provoked examination of assumptions and stereotypes (13). When she used the strategy with a group of fifth-grade girls, Jones noted that disconnections encouraged

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Gerry Mackie

Cass Sunstein details intrinsic flaws in group discussion, even in ideal deliberation, and draws attention to prediction markets and information-aggregation devices on the internet as supplements to discussion. I respond that the supposed flaws do not affect ideal deliberation, and that the evaluation of group discussion is too pessimistic: there are alternative hypotheses to account for his findings, and there are doubts about their external validity. Also, I contend that his evaluation of prediction markets and internet devices is too optimistic. The markets have failed miserably, and the internet is vulnerable to astroturfing by the powerful and wealthy.

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Falko Schmieder

The article undertakes a reconstruction of the invention and early discussions (from 1850 to 1870) of the metaphor survival of the fittest. It shows that the metaphor has been established at the intersection of two different formations: first, the classical paradigm of oeconomia naturae and the modern paradigm of evolutionary theory, and secondly in the tense atmosphere of different theoretical disciplines. Because of its impure origin and the inseparability of its social, political, and biological layers of meaning, the history of this metaphor must be written as an interdisciplinary history.

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Dhan Zunino Singh

The article outlines a possible course for mobility in Latin American history based on the diagnosis made by previous reviews on the field. It claims that although the emergence of new studies have signified a critical approach to transport technologies and greater emphasis on cultural and social practices of mobility, the term needs to be discussed more in theoretical terms to shape a common language among scholars from different perspectives. Moreover, mobility discussions should lead scholars to reconsider Latin America as a subject of analysis by critically revisiting the matter of periphery.

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Baruch Kimmerling

This article analyzes recent trends in Israeli public sociology and examines the extent to which Israeli sociologists have been engaged in the public realm. The basic presumption informing this essay is that since the 1967 War, Israeli society has been in a continuous state of crisis as a result of an inability to make decisions regarding the Occupied Territories. This crisis and its societal consequences have not been incorporated into Israeli academic sociology, either conceptually or paradigmatically. One result of this omission (but perhaps also its major cause) is the withdrawal of most Israeli sociologists from the public sphere and the lack of public sociology in Israel. The author calls for discussion and debate among his Israeli colleagues regarding this state of affairs.

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Ronald Aronson and Andrew Dobson

Sartre is left out of this commentary on Sartre. As students of Sartre, should we not ground ourselves in what Sartre actually said, in an appreciation of what he was up to, as well as in a willingness to engage the scholarship about his work? Given the richness both of Sartre’s writing and the interpretative literature, an article discussing Sartre’s notion of freedom and criticising his views on morality can fairly be taxed if it lacks these attentions. Of course Andrew Dobson is entitled to argue against Sartre, or against our various interpretations of Sartre, and to show why an anti-Sartrean ethical understanding such as his own is warranted. But what he gives us is misleading, because above all he ignores Sartre’s own evolving conception of freedom, and Sartre’s own changing purposes.

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Eric Langenbacher

Jörg Friedrich, Der Brand: Deutschland im Bombenkreig 1940-1945 (Munich: Propyläen Verlag, 2002)

Günther Grass, Crabwalk (Orlando: Harcourt, 2002)

W. G. Sebald, On the Natural History of Destruction (New York: Random House, 2003)

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Frédéric Viguier, Michael Lipsky, and Vincent Dubois

Welfare As It Is Frédéric Viguier

French Welfare Workers as Street-level Bureaucrats Michael Lipsky

A Reply to Michael Lipsky and Frédéric Viguier’s Comments Vincent Dubois

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Adrian van den Hoven

While reading Ron Aronson’s illuminating guide to the secular life, it struck me that, given the context, an exploration of the topic of Sartre and atheism was very much in order.

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Shirin Housee

This article explores the everyday experiences of minority ethnic students at a university in the West Midlands. Based on interviews with 23 second-level students taking Sociology modules, it seeks to highlight the key social, personal and pedagogic issues for this group of minority ethnic students and to deepen understandings of cultural identity and exchange on campus. The students' multiple narratives and voices are central to the article, as is the possibility that there are multiple ways of experiencing teaching and learning at a university.