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Masculinity on Stage

Dueling in the Greek Capital, 1870–1918

Dimitra Vassiliadou

The historiography of the duel in the nineteenth century is nearly three decades old. Important scholarship, closely studying Western societies where this ritual flourished, has shown only insignificant similarities with its earlier medieval

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Making Peace with the Duel of Narratives: Dual-Narrative Texts for Teaching the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Ned Lazarus

Sami Adwan and Dan Bar-On, eds., Learning the Other’s Historical Narrative: Israelis and Palestinians, Parts One and Two (Beit Jalla: Peace Research Institute in the Middle East, 2003, 2006).

Robert I. Rotberg, ed., Israeli and Palestinian Narratives of Conflict: History’s Double Helix (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006).

Paul Scham, Walid Salem, and Benjamin Pogrund, eds., Shared Histories: A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue (Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, 2005).

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Staging Presence for Spatial Dignity

Exploring Representations of Refugee Girlhood

Margaret Ravenscroft

-puppet Amal in this hostile environment context, I address the dueling realities of welcomeness and unwantedness, hypervisibility and invisibility, and spatiality dignity and spatial denial that refugee girls, real and represented, face. Employing the work of

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The Poetry of Snails

The Shown, the Intervened and the Signified in Duelo de caracoles (2010) by Sonia Pulido and Pere Joan

Benjamin Fraser

Duelo de caracoles [Duel of snails] in 2011. 3 No stranger to literary collaborations, Pulido has produced market-ready book covers for leading publishers, such as Anagrama and Plaza y Janés in Spain, and has worked as an illustrator with Xavi

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God's Voice in a Secular Society

A Christian Perspective

Trevor Wedman

Abstract

The following is a reflection on the way in which we can comprehend the divine in the secular world. The article attempts to show that the concept of God does not necessarily conflict in any way with secularism as such. Rather, the article suggests that the obscuring of God's voice can be attributed much more to the duelling modernist tendencies of Manichaeism on the one side, and value-nihilism on the other.

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Vying for credibility in the US Congress

Legitimating symbols in the debate over immunization and autism

Maya Ponte

Throughout the debate in the United States Congress over whether vaccines cause autism, legitimizing symbols that index cultural values have played a prominent role in the establishment of credibility. While both sides sanctify the role of science in producing credibility, they draw on different images of what science is and where its legitimacy stems from. Those who favor the vaccine hypothesis frame science as a populist endeavor, the results of which are open to critique by all. Those against the vaccine hypothesis frame science as an elitist endeavor, the results of which may only be critiqued by fellow scientists. While both of these images derive their significance from the cultural history of the United States, they have a markedly different impact on the interpretation of evidence. From within the populist frame, personal experience and direct observation are highly valued. From within the elitist frame, epidemiological evidence trumps personal experience. Due to the incorporation of dueling images of science, the US debate over autism may be viewed as a debate between rival cultural values.

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Legitimate Suspicions? Berlusconi and the Judges

David Nelken

The relationship in the course of 2002 between Silvio Berlusconi’s

government and the judges was one of continued and unrelenting

conflict. Few days passed wherein justice was not a central news item.

Accounts of battles between the government and the judiciary carried

titles such as “the duel,” and offered complex descriptions of the

moves and countermoves, in both Parliament and the courts, involving

the government, the opposition, judges, prosecutors, lawyers, and

the accused. Cases of political, administrative, and business corruption

still came to light from different parts of the country, such as

Turin, Milan, Potenza, Salerno, and Agrigento. But the heady days of

Tangentopoli were long over: it was now the judges who were themselves

under attack. For most of the year, Berlusconi and his associates

cast themselves in the role of victims by arguing that they were

being prosecuted and tried by politically and personally biased judges.

The judiciary was made the object of co-ordinated mass media campaigns

that set out in particular to discredit the Milan court and more

generally to show that when judges’ actions were effective, they were

often illegitimate, and that when they were legitimate, they were usually

not effective. Although some of the printed media still gave

unswerving support to the judges, there was little doubt that the initiative

had passed to the government and its parliamentary majority.

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Dialectics of Islam and Global Modernity

Mohammed A. Bamyeh

The globalization of modernity obviously exceeds in its profundity the signifiers of open pathways and commodity circulation—clothing, music, food, and so on—tend to capture much of our immediate attention. In the first place, among tales of cultural dissemination modernity has the unique feature that it made its epoch without a heroic duel with any opposing force. The effort expended today to magnify the scale of supposedly ‘anti-modern’ fanaticism, or to force the world into the logic of a clash of ‘civilizations’ notwithstanding, the globalization of modernity owes much to the fact that, in its broadest outlines, it has never been truly rejected by any significant force in any society. Hardly any commentator on modernity, after all, defines the term in ways, which, upon closer inspection, reveal anything in modernity that should be anathema to social processes and longings everywhere. If we define modernity in terms of material outcomes—prosperity, longevity, lack of scarcity, leisure time, better communication systems, better housing, education, a wider range of consumer commodities—it is hard to see how any of this could be opposed by anybody, although these outcomes may be rejected by ascetic monks in any society, modern or not. If we define modernity in terms of social structure, such as predominantly urban life and within it a strong bourgeois class, it is easy to see that this outcome has been the conscious goal of policies in most of the world even before the termination of the alternative path of East bloc socialism.

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Fudging the Outcome of Much Ado About Nothing

How the Villains, Don Pedro and Count Claudio, Are Allowed to Stay and Dance

Paul Rapley

woman's reputation as for tolerating direct insults to their character and refusing to answer challenges to duel. Plenty of evidence attests to Shakespeare's being very conversant with the codes of gentlemanly behaviour, yet, rather than the pair's being

Open access

Editorial

Sharon A. Kowalsky

, expressed through dueling. Identifying the duel as a foreign import, Vassiliadou traces its integration into middle-class Greek society as a means to defend male honor from public and political insult. She argues that protecting one's honor through dueling