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Brian L. Wright and Donna Y. Ford

behavioral evaluations—with no mention of gifted education evaluation. 1 As faculty teaching at primarily White universities, we have ongoing thoughts about the brilliant Xaviers in early childhood. Our classes on education mostly consist of White female

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Interiority and government of the child

Transparency, risk, and good governance in Indonesia

Jan Newberry

early childhood education) was one of many aimed at children in the zaman emas , or golden age of zero to eight years of age. Since 2001, there has been a dramatic increase in the programming for early childhood care and education (ECEC) in Indonesia

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There Are No Girl Pirate Captains

Boys, Girls and the "Boy Crisis" in Preschool

Sally Campbell Galman and Christine A. Mallozzi

This paper employs data from from a multi-year, ethnographic study of children in a diverse public preschool to destabilize some of the claims of the “boy crisis” literature (Hoff-Somers, 2000). Focusing on fine-grained analyses of events in the study context, the authors illustrate the complexity of everyday interactions between female teachers and the male and female preschoolers in their classes, as well as between the male and female preschoolers themselves. These analyses suggest that a preschool environment where all teachers are female is as patriarchally and hegemonically saturated as any other context, as both boys and girls (and teachers) are subject to, and invariably take up, powerful cultural scripts reflected in children’s and other media in the larger cultural milieu. Further, we emphasize that preschool—arguably among the most “feminized” school environments—is more complex than “boy crisis” proponents present.

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Boarding School for First-Grade Black Boys

Stereotypes, a Single-Sex Program, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Joseph D. Nelson and Sangeeta Subedi

Single-sex schooling for boys of color has become popular throughout the United States. Leaders and educators often consider these environments a school-based intervention to address adverse outcomes associated with Black boys. A contributing factor to these outcomes have been negative stereotypes of Black males related to Black masculinity norms, which developmental psychologists contend boys internalize during childhood. Interviews and observations were conducted over 12 months to describe a single-sex boarding program for first-grade African-American boys, affiliated with a coed independent school. Designed to facilitate boys’ positive identity development, the program’s mission and vision, educational philosophy, and schedule/programming will be primarily described from boys’ perspectives. The goal is to explore the merits of this single-sex intervention to ameliorate how Black male stereotypes and masculinity norms contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline.

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Children's Sociality

The Civilizing Project in the Danish Kindergarten

Karen Fog Olwig

The increasing institutionalization of childhood in Western societies has generated concern in the social sciences regarding the disciplinary and regulating regimes of institutions and their presumed constraints on children's social interaction. This article argues that institutions for children can also enable such social interaction. Drawing on Norbert Elias's proposal that child rearing entails a civilizing project, this article contends that being 'not-yet-civilized' enables children to draw on a wide range of emotions and bodily expressions that are unavailable to adults. Through an analysis of life stories narrated by Danish youths, it is shown that common grounds of interaction were established in early childhood, allowing them to turn this adultconstructed institution into a place of their own where they could develop a sense of sociality.

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Alienation, Ambivalence and Identity

Jhumpa Lahiri’s In Other Words

Mohammad Shafiqul Islam

Abstract

Jhumpa Lahiri’s latest book, In Other Words, is an autobiographical text that highlights the author’s journey to a new land and language. She grows up in America, communicates in Bengali with her parents during her early childhood and uses English in school; a sense of ambivalence about language dawns in her at this time. Her parents insist that Bengali be a dominant language in her life, but she falls in love with English, which later becomes her own language and the medium of her literary writing. During her doctoral studies, she feels an impulse to learn Italian and desperately strives to speak and write in that language. In Other Words, originally written in Italian, is the ultimate outcome of her aspirations to learn Italian. As the author switches from one language to another, from Bengali to English, and then from English to Italian, she forms an ambivalent sense of separation and proximity. This article seeks to explore Lahiri’s love for language, her sense of alienation and belonging, loss and achievement, and her search for identity and metamorphosis.

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Jessica Prioletta

my participant observation during children’s play periods. Through this process, three themes emerged. The first theme centered on pedagogy and reflected the notion that play is a good and necessary pedagogical practice in early childhood education

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David Detmer and John Ireland

increasing radicalism of Sartre’s later political stances worldwide. Dennis Gilbert offers an account of the origins of Sartre’s career as a dramatist, in which we see how his early childhood enthusiasm for the theater can persuasively be linked to the

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Women and children together and apart

Finding the time for social reproduction theory

Jan Newberry and Rachel Rosen

collaboration has focused on early childhood education and care (ECEC), because of our research and activist experiences with programs in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Indonesia. In Canada, Rachel Rosen was seeing mothers, as well as childcare and domestic

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Editorial

Boyhood Studies at 10

Diederik F. Janssen

Philippa Henderson studied conceptualizations of sport during the early childhood years of participants, seeking to include children’s voices in the research process, specifically as facilitated by visual participatory research. Furthermore, they report on