Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 554 items for :

Clear All
Full access

Shaping Edits, Creating Fractals

A Cinematic Case Study

James E. Cutting and Karen Pearlman

We investigated physical changes over three versions in the production of the short historical drama, Woman with an Editing Bench (2016, The Physical TV Company). Pearlman, the film’s director and editor, had also written about the work that editors do to create rhythms in film (Pearlman 2016), and, through the use of computational techniques employed previously (Cutting et al. 2018), we found that those descriptions of the editing process had parallels in the physical changes of the film as it progressed from its first assembled form, through a fine cut, to the released film. Basically, the rhythms of the released film are not unlike the rhythms of heartbeats, breathing, and footfalls—they share the property of “fractality.” That is, as Pearlman shaped a story and its emotional dynamics over successive revisions, she also (without consciously intending to do so) fashioned several dimensions of the film— shot duration, motion, luminance, chroma, and clutter—so as to make them more fractal.

Full access

Karen Pearlman

This article considers the cognitive complexity of creative decision making in film editing. It asks, would it be productive for cognitive scholars of the moving image to investigate the perceptual, affective, and cognitive impact of editing on

Full access

Ivan Mozzhukhin’s Acting Style

Beyond the Kuleshov Effect

Johannes Riis

experiment, the “Kuleshov effect,” has often been uncritically taken to demonstrate the power of editing in bringing out emotions with or despite blank or inexpressive close-ups. The concept of a Kuleshov effect is typically presented in courses on film

Free access

Stephen Prince

When Sam Peckinpah turned over his raw footage for Ride the High Country

(1962) to the MGM studio editor, she declared that the material he had filmed

for the final gunfight was incompetent and that it could not be edited together

in a coherent way. Viewed today, the scene does not seem especially

transgressive in its treatment of continuity, but in that earlier period when

studio editing rules were more conservative, Peckinpah’s disregard for standardized

camera set-ups and conventional coverage perplexed and infuriated

MGM’s editor.

Full access

Joerg Fingerhut

before the cut ( Ildirar and Schwan 2015 ; Schwan and Ildirar 2010 ). Subjects exposed to TV and Hollywood cinema, on the other hand, have incorporated such filmic perceptual patterns as second nature to the extent that they exert “edit blindness” for

Free access

David Gerard

A Bibliography of Books Written or Edited by John Lucas in Chronological Order

Full access

Paul Messaris, Cynthia Freeland, Sheena Rogers, Malcolm Turvey, Greg M. Smith, Daniel T. Levin, Alicia M. Hymel and Tim J. Smith

CONTINUITY AND ITS DISCONTENTS

Paul Messaris

CONTINUITY, NARRATIVE, AND CROSS-MODAL CUING OF ATTENTION

Cynthia Freeland

AUTEUR OF ATTENTION: THE FILMMAKER AS COGNITIVE SCIENTIST

Sheena Rogers

THE CONTINUITY OF NARRATIVE COMPREHENSION

Malcolm Turvey

CONTINUITY IS NOT CONTINUOUS

Greg M. Smith

MAKING THE CASE FOR NONPREDICTIVE CONTINUITY PERCEPTION

Daniel T. Levin and Alicia M. Hymel

EXTENDING ATOCC: A REPLY

Tim J. Smith

Full access

Rory Loughnane

W.W. Greg first identified the dumb show in Hamlet as problematic: if Claudius sees the dumb show, which replicates his murder of Old Hamlet in mime, then why does he not react until much later? Many explanations have been offered, and this article responds to (in title and argument) John Dover Wilson’s influential account in What Happens in Hamlet (1935) which inspired much further debate. First discussing the anomalous nature of the dumb show in Hamlet, before turning to the different versions of the dumb show as they appear in the three substantive texts of Hamlet, this article considers the nature and content of the information supplied by dumb shows and the critical arguments that can be developed from these slippery inset performances.

Full access

Carl Knight

The Global Justice Reader edited by Thom Brooks

Full access

Sermin Ildirar and Louise Ewing

The Kuleshov effect is a film-editing effect that was demonstrated during the late 1910s and early 1920s by the pioneering Russian filmmaker and theorist Lev Kuleshov (1899–1970). Famously, Kuleshov is reported to have intercut a close-up of the