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The Determination of Educational Policy

Shas, Politics, and Religion

Anat Feldman

This article aims to broaden understanding of the intersection of political power and educational policy. Researchers in various fields have analyzed how a state determines its educational policy, which typically follows a value- and principle

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Frédéric Viguier

War II. 20 For example, the “Young Moroccans” movement of the 1930s challenged the restrictive colonial educational policies in the name of Moroccan development. 21 Between World War II and independence, France implemented policies of development and

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Gender Policy in Australian Schools

A Missed Opportunity?

Deborah Hartman

This paper describes the rise of boys’ education as a substantial social and educational issue in Australia in the 1990s, mapping the changes in Australian discourses on boys’ education in this period. Ideas and authors informed by the men’s movement entered the discourses about boys’ education, contributing to a wave of teacher experimentation and new ways of thinking about gender policies in schools. The author suggests that there is currently a policy impasse, and proposes a new multi-disciplinary approach bringing together academic, practitioner, policy, and public discourses on boys’ education.

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Nikolett Szelei

, they did note that other languages were used in their family environment (54). Such findings matter to the ways educational policy names and categorises as well as responds to multilingualism in education. Although multilingualism has been part of the

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How Movements Are Mediated

The Case of the Hungarian Student Network in 2012–2013

Bálint Takács, Sára Bigazzi, Ferenc Arató, and Sára Serdült

online “handbook” published by the movement. The movement’s policy demands and politico-philosophical ideals about how to act politically were both clearly present in their proclamations. Furthermore, HaHa’s concrete educational policy objectives can be

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Giancarlo Gasperoni

In 2005, the educational policies promoted by the center-right, and in

particular by the minister of education, universities, and research, Letizia

Moratti, saw several significant developments. No doubt they will be the

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Interculturality

Where Do We Go From Here?

Jennifer Lucko and Alicia Re Cruz

This issue provides striking examples of how current educational policies and practices play a fundamental role in processes that constitute immigrant and ethnic minority children as ‘others’. This collective compendium not only interweaves theory and practice but also initiates a trans-Atlantic conversation about intercultural education embracing ethnographic cases from North America (Texas), South America (Bolivia) and Europe (Spain). These conversations lead towards an interesting exercise of similarities and differences in how interculturality is used and understood in the classroom, based on the local fluid composition of ideological, ethnic, political and economic factors.

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Local Language Education in Southern Siberia

The Republics of Tyva and Altai

Joan F. Chevalier

This interdisciplinary study presents an overview of local and federal policies affecting language education in southern Siberia in the Republic of Altai and the Republic of Tyva. In the 1990s, as part of a broader effort to revitalize local languages, educational policies were adopted that aimed to strengthen local language education. Since 2005, in part due to federal education reforms, priorities in language education have shifted. Grassroots support for strengthening local language education has faded with the introduction of federally mandated high stakes testing. The comparison of policies in these two regions highlights the negative effects of federal education reforms on local language education.

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Alena Vasilievna Ivanova

This article covers the process of identity construction in children; this process defines the focus of Russian educational policy, which also provides a venue for alternative ways to implement it. The article presents research on designing a system to form national, regional, and ethnocultural identity in children of the indigenous people of the North via the curriculum and teaching aids. The article examines regions of Russia inhabited by indigenous small-numbered peoples, as well as their distinctive features, which have a significant impact on the process of identity construction in children of the North. This has revealed the specific character of the large formation of positive types of identity within the educational system.

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Capital Flows Through Language

Market English, Biopower, and the World Bank

J. Paul Narkunas

In 1997, the World Bank Group1 published in English one of its many country studies, entitled Vietnam: Education Financing. Its goal was to measure ‘what changes in educational policies will ensure that students who pass through the system today will acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for Vietnam to complete the transition successfully from a planned to a market economy’(World Bank 1997: xiii). Skills, knowledge, and attitude designate the successfully ‘educated’ Vietnamese national subjects for the bank. The educational ‘system’ performs, therefore, a disciplinary function by using the technologies of the nation state to cultivate productive humans—measured by technical expertise and computer and business skills—for transnational companies who do business in the region.