Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 666 items for :

  • "empirical" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Deliberative Democracy

Taking Stock and Looking Ahead - Selen A. Ercan with André Bächtiger

Selen A. Ercan and André Bächtiger

Deliberative democracy is a growing branch of democratic theory. It suggests understanding and assessing democracy in terms of the quality of communication among citizens, politicians, as well as between citizens and politicians. In this interview, drawing on his extensive research on deliberative practice within and beyond parliaments, André Bächtiger reflects on the development of the field over the last two decades, the relationship between normative theory and empirical research, and the prospects for practicing deliberation in populist times.

Restricted access

Ross E. Mitchell

The concept of ecological democracy has been employed to illustrate how rapid ecological and environmental change poses significant problems for existing democratic structures. If the term is to prove useful, however, it must be better conceptualized and empirically tested. This article addresses this challenge by first outlining key empirical intersections of environment and democracy, then providing a working definition of ecological democracy. Four plausible research hypotheses are also recommended to guide future analyses of ecological democracy.

Restricted access

Henning Best

This article aims to empirically test the so called low-cost hypothesis. The hypothesis posits that cost moderates the strength of the relationship between environmental concern and behavior. The effects of the behavioral cost and environmental concern on household waste recycling were evaluated, using empirical data collected from 2,695 respondents in Cologne, Germany. Empirically, a clear effect of both behavioral cost and environmental concern can be identified. Recycling rates are higher when a curbside scheme is implemented or the distance to collection containers is low. In addition, the probability of recycling participation rises when the actor has a pronounced environmental concern. This effect of environmental attitudes does not vary with behavioral cost and opportunities. Therefore, the low-cost hypothesis is not supported by the study.

Free access

Stefan Böschen, Jochen Gläser, Martin Meister and Cornelius Schubert

Recent years have seen an increasing interest in materiality in social research. Some might say that materiality is now back on the agenda of social research. The challenges of bringing materiality back have spurred lively debates about material agency, most of which, however, are leveled at the largely dematerialized theories of the social in the social sciences, for example, in material culture studies (Appadurai 1986; Miller 1998) as well as science and technology studies (Latour 1988; Law/Mol 1995). Since the turn of the century, a marked shift towards the material has emerged (cf. Hicks 2010), ranging from questions concerning nature (Grundmann/Stehr 2000) and everyday objects (Molotch 2003; Costall/Dreier 2006; Miller 2010) to issues of cultural theory (Reckwitz 2002), post-phenomenology (Verbeek 2005), ethnography (Henare et al. 2007), distributed cognition (Hutchins 1995), and materiality in general (Dant 2005; Miller 2005; Knappett/Malafouris 2008). A perspective on materiality is now being developed in diverse fields such as archaeology (Meskell 2005), economic sociology (Pinch/Swedberg 2008), political science (Bennett 2010; Coole/Frost 2010), and organization studies (Carlile et al. 2013). Yet the status of the material remains debated in the evolving fields of various “new” materialisms (cf. Lemke 2015).

Open access

Afterword

The Urban and the Carceral

Steffen Jensen

the two. Hence, while it is still perfectly possible to find prison studies utterly uninterested in anything outside the prison wall and urban studies seemingly oblivious to the empirical and conceptual connections between prison and urban margins, a

Restricted access

The Meanings of the Move?

From “Predicaments of Mobility” to “Potentialities in Displacement”

Stephen C. Lubkemann

seemingly most dire circumstances)—treated as an open empirical question. The transformation of an individual’s relationship to place through migration (or conversely through immobilization) can profoundly alter the social opportunity structures that

Restricted access

Roberto Farneti

religious heterogeneity and is an objective condition amenable to empirical scrutiny, whereas p occurs when the two groups that fill the political spectrum push their partisan attitudes to the extreme. Confrontation may escalate into reciprocal loathing in

Restricted access

Two Worlds of Environmentalism?

Empirical Analyses on the Complex Relationship between Postmaterialism, National Wealth, and Environmental Concern

Jochen Mayerl and Henning Best

is the direct outcome of a country’s wealth. As such, individuals in wealthier countries should be more environmentally concerned ( Franzen and Vogl 2013 ). However, empirical studies testing this hypothesis found inconclusive evidence (see later

Restricted access

David Davies

questions about the nature of our actual responses and normative questions about “merited” responses, Davies stresses the centrality of the latter in the philosophy of art and queries the ability of empirical research to address them. Things rather work in

Restricted access

Rainer Reisenzein

theorists look to psychology. Ideally, what they find there is an empirically supported theory relevant to the phenomenon of interest (e.g., a theory of surprise in the case of the plot twist). And fourth, this theory is then used to explain the effects of