Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "end of life" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

‘Takin’ It One Day at a Time’

(Not) Anticipating as Moral Project

Devin Flaherty

In this article, I explore anticipation as a site of moral experience and moral willing when death may be nearby. Through an examination of the narratives of the wife of a hospice patient in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, I show that her commitment to not anticipate the course of her husband’s illness is a moral project pitted against biomedical modes of prognostication. In a context in which hospice care is the only option available for many older adults in poor health, I discuss the incommensurability between this position and the anticipatory horizon on which hospice care is predicated: the patient’s imminent death. I argue for an approach to this woman’s experience that takes into account the tendency for temporal orientations to be thrown into flux when death might be nearby, without reducing her commitment to not anticipate to mere avoidance or ‘denial’.

Free access

Cancer the Bogeyman and Me

Reflexivity and Emotion in 'End of Life' Research

Fiona M. Harris

This article explores the embodied nature of training in social anthropology and reveals how, while working in multidisciplinary teams and drawing on research methods and approaches more commonly associated with other disciplines, one might still be 'outed' in one's interpretation and analysis. I draw on the experience of working on a project exploring methodological issues and challenges to conducting research with terminally ill cancer patients to reveal the importance of situating ourselves as researchers firmly within the prejudices of our own societies. While personal experience of losing a parent to cancer should have alerted me to other ways of seeing cancer, I was nevertheless obliged to confront sociocultural constructions of cancer and recognise them as my own. Through understanding the power of 'imagined experience', I gained further insight into how intersubjectivity and reflexivity are crucial to the research process.

Restricted access

Elizabeth F. S. Roberts

Sharon Kaufman, And a time to die: How American hospitals shape the end of life. New York: Scribner, 2004, 416 pp., ISBN 0-743-26476-2.

Lesley A. A. Sharp, Strange harvest: Organ transplants, denatured bodies, and the transformed self. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006, 322 pp., ISBN 0-520-24786-8.

Full access

Nicola Pasini

In Italy, a public debate about the death of Eluana Englaro was set in

motion that eventually extended itself to all of the problems related

to living wills. The controversy that developed around these events

represents a case of applied public ethics that involved moral problems

related to public policy decisions. The debate demonstrates

how such (bio)ethical questions have now become priorities on

the political agenda. Decision-makers are constantly called upon to

decide and intervene in very complex and difficult environments,

both at the beginning of life (such as the debate over Law No. 40

in relation to assisted fertilization and that relative to the abortion

pill RU-486) and at the end of life. Until only a short time ago, these

environments were strictly relegated to an individual, family, or

medical dimension.

Restricted access

Lionel Blue

Abstract

In this article, Lionel Blue contemplates approaching the end of life. The rabbinic tradition describes this world as a ‘prozdor’, a corridor to the world to come. We are ‘in between’ creations, with a toehold in heaven, yet intimations of heaven can be found in this life. As for dying, that can be a messy business. ‘I do not like the pain which accompanies all transformation.’ Dying is very different in the experience of those who are left behind, who wish to hold on to the one who is dying, whereas the latter may need silent companionship and permission to depart. Lionel offers some personal stratagems for dealing with old age. Indulge yourself and treat yourself insofar as your medication allows. Treasure friendships. Keep up your conversation with God.

Open access

Denise Turner and Bronwen Gillespie

distressing information. In a different story, Emma’s iPad is a ‘bloody miracle’ in navigating her terminal illness (105). Veronica’s story, by contrast, is characterised by the difficulties of communication at end of life. Having spent her entire career

Free access

Introduction

Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Children in the Middle East

Erika Friedl and Abderrahmane Moussaoui

globalised through modern sports and Internet games; where parental authority is dwindling yet a developing teen culture is prolonging dependencies of teens on parents; and where, at the other end of life, the care of the elderly is becoming a burden on the

Restricted access

In Fortune Fair and Foul

Happiness and Care of the Self in Sir Kenelm Digby's Letter-Book In Praise of Venetia

Paula Barros

, see Keith Thomas, The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfilment in Early Modern England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), 214–217. 26 LB III, 90. 27 LB I, 144. 28 Ibid., 139. 29 Ibid., 122. 30 Thomas, The Ends of Life , 217. 31 On

Restricted access

Victoria Churikova, Alexey Druzyaka, and Alina Galimova

States, and several European countries. However, periods and magnitude of mortality and annual variations are specific to each region. In Siberia, the bursts of solar and geomagnetic activity at the beginning and the end of life are followed by a high

Free access

Katrin Röder and Christoph Singer

Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life (London: Penguin, 2014), 6–7; William Davies, The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being (London: Verso, 2015), 13–39; Withington, ‘Invention’, 24. 13 Keith Thomas, The Ends of