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Introduction

Ethnographies of Private Security

Erella Grassiani and Tessa Diphoorn

growth of private security somewhat later. Although there are various ethnographic accounts of security providers operating outside of the state, such as gangs or militias (e.g., Baker 2008 , 2010 ; Buur 2006 ; Goldstein 2005 , 2012 ; Hansen and

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Introduction

Ethnographic engagements with global elites

Paul Robert Gilbert and Jessica Sklair

, whose ethnography of family firms in Northern Italy had earlier explored the mutual constitution of kinship and capitalism ( Yanagisako 2002 ), finds in Piketty an important insight into the “structure of inequality,” as he distinguishes the unequal

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Lisen Dellenborg and Margret Lepp

of how drama and ethnography can be combined into ethnographic drama and introduced into healthcare settings for research on how to support healthcare professionals in their everyday work. Kirsten Hastrup (2017: 316 ) suggests that collaboration

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Introduction

Confinement Beyond Site: Connecting Urban and Prison Ethnographies

Julienne Weegels, Andrew M. Jefferson, and Tomas Max Martin

question of how citizenship is reconfigured through hybrid forms of security governance. The GPRN was established with the purpose of bringing together scholars engaged in the ethnographic study of prisons in the global south to both fill an empirical gap

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The ethnographic negative

Capturing the impress of boredom and inactivity

Bruce O’Neill

, nothing to do. This claim to be “doing nothing” cuts against an ethnographic sensibility. As the craft of participant observation has shown time and again, people cannot help but be engaged in doing something. Sitting, pacing, or staring at a parking lot

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Introduction

Ethnographic Engagement with Bureaucratic Violence

Erin R. Eldridge and Amanda J. Reinke

decisions are made, knowledge is created, and power is exerted in ways that affect the everyday lives of citizens. Ethnography is thus well suited for unveiling the “humanness” and everyday realities of bureaucratic practice and interactions (2011: 7). In an

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A gendered ethnography of elites

Women, inequality, and social reproduction

Luna Glucksberg

Introduction: A gendered, critical ethnography of elites This article answers the call of this theme section—for an anthropology of elites that is both ethnographic and attuned to political economic critique—by looking ethnographically at the

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Internal Others

Ethnographies of Naturalism

Matei Candea and Lys Alcayna-Stevens

'Naturalism' is invoked with increasing frequency by anthropologists as a distinctively Western ontology which posits a shared unitary nature, upon which are overlain multiple 'cultures', 'perspectives', or 'worldviews'. But where, if at all, is this ontology to be found? Anthropologists working outside Europe and America have in various ways been urging colleagues to challenge 'our' naturalism in order to be able to take seriously alternative ethnographic realities. In the meantime, anthropologists and STS scholars who study European or American settings ethnographically have increasingly been arguing that 'we' were never (quite) naturalist to begin with. This double move shores 'naturalism' up as a conceptual object, but renders it ethnographically elusive, a perpetually receding horizon invoked in accounts of something else. This introduction explores this paradox and presents the subsequent articles' various experiments with what might seem an impossible task: the ethnography of naturalism itself.

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Dmitry V. Arzyutov and Sergei A. Kan

). Besides, “the missionary ethnography” often manifests itself in texts of Soviet ethnographers, the first generation of which considered missionaries not as much as rivals but rather as people more knowledgeable about the cultures they studied than anyone

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Gauging the Mood

Operationalizing Emotion through Ethnography

Brian Callan

This article illustrates a case study of an ethnographic research project in order to highlight the processes by which the project thesis emerged, the form of the knowledge on which it is based, and the relationship of that form of knowledge to other disciplines. The case-study is part of a larger ethnographic research project based in Jerusalem area between 2011 and 2012 on the sociality and affective processes involved in what is normally referred to as pro-Palestinian activism. Current anthropological concerns and debates are highlighted and discussed by following the ethnographic process from the development of a proposal based on a perceptual model of affect (Damasio, 2000), to ‘learning with people’ to the fieldwork phase (Ingold, 2008), to the analysis, interpretation of findings through the intersubjective faculty of judging (Arendt, 1968). Specifically, this work aims to clarify the form and validity of knowledge produced by an ethnographic engagement with phenomenological theory. Using an extract from field notes, from which I developed a thesis on role of weirdness in dissent, I highlight the intersubjective and emergent nature of knowledge production in ethnography through the development of trusting relationships with participants and the generative tensions and possibilities of being a researcher while also becoming an activist. In this process, the knowledge produced represents neither the participants’ nor the researcher’s understandings of the world but resides in what Arendt called a ‘third position’. Such a method of knowledge production should also be apposite to interdisciplinary exchanges within academia."