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Anne Meneley

In Zabid, Republic of Yemen, women often succumb to an illness called 'fright' (faja'a) when they or their loved ones are, or are believed to be, in danger. The shock of a sudden threat to oneself or one's family, through illness or accident, is said to cause the soul to shake, leaving one vulnerable to 'fright'. This essay traces women's stories about their fright experiences and their recovery (or failure to recover). Zabidi women hold to a worldview inflected by the tenet that 'all is from God', yet ironically fright illnesses, their treatment, and narratives about them dwell uncomfortably on the difficulty of accepting the will of God when it means the loss of a loved one.

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Agnes G. Loeffler

This article offers an analysis of two medical case histories presented by an Iranian allopathic physician to illustrate the power of diet in the management of disease. Uncovering underlying cultural assumptions about health and health maintenance strategies leads to the following insights: (1) Galenic medical ideas have not been replaced by allopathic theories in the world view of Iranian physicians; (2) allopathic medical treatment options (pharmaceuticals) are applied to indigenous disease categories; (3) there is deep-seated scepticism about etiologic theories of allopathic medicine and its ability to treat certain conditions; (4) the authority of allopathic medicine is not unquestioned in Iran.

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The Poetics of Anti-Americanism in Greece

Rhetoric, Agency, and Local Meaning

Elisabeth Kirtsoglou and Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

In this article we examine the content and rationale of anti-Americanism in Greece, drawing ethnographic information from two urban centers, Patras and Volos. We pay special attention to the conspiracy theory attributes of this rhetoric, and, instead of dismissing it or seeing it primarily as a manifestation of nationalist thinking, we attempt to unpack the threads of meaning that make it so appealing in local contexts. We look in particular at the etiology of blame within this particular discourse and try to explain the specific readings of history and politics that make it significant in local contexts. We argue that Greek anti-Americanism has an empowering potential for local actors, as it provides them with a certain degree of discursive agency over wider political processes that are beyond their immediate control.

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Margaret Litvin

A scorpion, its poisonous tail torn out, runs desperate circles around a piece of burning coal. A small boy sits in front of a screen, watching a film of a play translated from one language he does not understand into another. Twenty-five years later, these two events – an upper- Egyptian game, a Russian film of an English play – coalesce into a one-act play called Dance of the Scorpions, an Arabic-language offshoot of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. This, at any rate, is the simple etiology offered by the offshoot play’s creator, Egyptian playwright/ director Mahmoud Aboudoma. Let me summarise Aboudoma’s offshoot play and two versions of his first Shakespeare encounter before pointing to the larger questions these stories help to frame. This article will then make a start at addressing those questions.

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Diederik F. Janssen

etiological puzzle in its historical contexts—factors that range from changing valuations of childhood, an evolving bio-medicalization notably of home and school environments, and advancing technologies, and interests, in weighing the probability of inner

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Ebola and Accusation

Gender and Stigma in Sierra Leone’s Ebola Response

Olive Melissa Minor

’s etiology: why Ebola affects particular individuals or groups rather than merely how EVD transmits and causes illness. Ebola-affected communities faced existential questions about why some people became infected with EVD and others did not, and why some

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A Theory of ‘Animal Borders’

Thoughts and Practices toward Non-human Animals among the G|ui Hunter-Gatherers

Kazuyoshi Sugawara

’, which embraces the potentiality of illness. (2) As the same material X enters B’, that potentiality is transmuted into actuality so that B’ becomes a sick body Ƀ. The inversion of this etiological scenario brings about a pragmatic scenario for

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The Biologically Vulnerable Boy

Framing Sex Differences in Childhood Infectious Disease Mortality

Heather T. Battles

. Thorne . 1894 . “ The Etiology, Spread and Prevention of Diphtheria .” Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health 15 , no. 1 : 7 – 20 . Trivers , Robert L. , and D.E. Willard . 1973 . “ Natural Selection of Parental Ability to

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Confronting Tyranny in a Public Health Agency

Crafting a ‘Philosophy of Praxis’ into a ‘Community of Resistance’

Brian McKenna

etiologies to illness and disease. And if the social and psychological factors are recognised, they are seldom reimbursable. I consulted Hal Draper’s excellent Karl Marx’s Theory of Revolution, State and Bureaucracy ( Draper 1977 ), to characterise a more

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Kathleen Lennon

Walzer, ‘Preface’, in Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate , by Jean-Paul Sartre (New York: Schocken Books, 1995), v–xxvi. 43 Memmi, The Liberation of the Jew , quoted in Walzer, ‘Preface’, xxii. 44 Interestingly, Butler, in her