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Witnessing and Testimony as Event

Israeli NGOs, Palestinian Witnesses, and the Undoing of Human Rights Bureaucracy

Omri Grinberg

Introduction: on the way to the event In August 2013, I joined Sa'id, a Palestinian fieldworker from an Israeli human rights (hereinafter, HR) non-governmental organization (NGO) to collect the testimony of two brothers from the Suleiman

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On the Touch-Event

Theopolitical Encounters

Valentina Napolitano

If one googles the word ‘touch-event’, what comes up is a definition of a keyword in the Java programming language—TouchEvent—that governs the interface between a given piece of software and a user's contact with a piece of touch

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The Urban Politics of Mega-Events

Grand Promises Meet Local Resistance

John Lauermann

Sports mega-events have long been promoted as drivers of urban development, based on their potential to generate physical, economic, and social legacies for host cities (see reviews in Andranovich and Burbank 2011 ; Essex and Chalkley 1998

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Intimate Events

The Correctness of Affective Transactions in Northeast Brazil

Matan Shapiro

Drawing on ethnographic research in the Brazilian state of Maranhão, this article proposes the concept of the 'intimate event' as a heuristic device in the cross-cultural study of kinship and relatedness. This theoretical construct refers to the retrospective recognition of affective transactions as meaningfully intimate, that recognition being an event which in Maranhão compels ethical reflection. Intimacy can be imagined as an aesthetic of practice that indicates when something simply feels right, and which then frames the correctness of both moral conformity and transgression in affective terms.

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The Vindication of Chaka Zulu

Retreat into the Enchantment of the Past

C. Bawa Yamba

The article deals with two competing explanations advanced by local people in a Zambian village to make sense of the presence of man-eating crocodiles in the area. One faction explains the events in rational terms, while the other sees them as the work of witches, as a result of which they demand the return of a witchfinder, whose activities a decade ago had left 16 people dead. The article shows how the competing explanations are reflections of political rivalry between the local chieftainess and her detractors, who perceive her attempts to modernize the area as a way to line her own pocket. The rationalized versus enchanted definitions of events form the point of departure for examining some of the underlying premises of the extended-case method, namely, those of perceiving social phenomena as constituting an interrelated whole, and for determining when to close the flow of events for analysis.

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Sally Falk Moore

Gluckman's approach to case studies is seen as a pivotal moment in the history of social anthropology. The shift was from normative accounts of structure to the tracking of sequences of events. An example from the author's study of happenings on Kilimanjaro illustrates the complex factors that enter a processual approach. Some dimensions of a century of social history can be seen to surround the struggle over a piece of property.

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Protest Events, Welfare Generosity, and Welfare State Regimes

A Comparative Analysis of Welfare States and Social Unrest

David Pritchard

relationships between protest events and welfare arrangements. Thus the following question can be posed: Do relatively extensive social citizenship rights and generous welfare systems lead to social stability? It is hypothesized that countries with lower levels

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Sick Weather Ahead

On Data-Mining, Crowd-Sourcing and White Noise

Carlo Caduff

The main concern of this article is with the ways in which technologies of data-mining and crowd-sourcing have made it possible for citizens to contribute to the expansion of infectious disease surveillance as both a concrete practice and a compelling fantasy. But I am less interested in participation as such, and more concerned with the epistemological effects that this technological mediation might have for the possibility of epidemic events to become shared objects of knowledge. What happens with epidemic events when they become targets of data-mining and crowd-sourcing technologies?

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Chronology of Italian Political Events, 1999

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Debora Mantovani

Chronology of Italian Political Events, 2005