Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,108 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Everyday Diplomacy

Introduction to Special Issue

Magnus Marsden, Diana Ibañez-Tirado and David Henig

older and newer work across the fields of political geography and critical geopolitics that has focused on ‘popular’ forms of geopolitics, everyday diplomacies, and, more generally, the role of culture in diplomatic practice. Importantly, some of the

Restricted access

L'événement et le quotidien

Une ethnologie du salon dans un quartier de gecekondu d'Ankara (Turquie)

Benoit Fliche

This article analyses the evolution in the ways of managing the event and the everyday in a gecekondu (squatter’s house) neighbourhood in Ankara, Turkey. It focuses on the sitting room as a space of reception and a space of life located at the crossing of the event and the everyday. In the village, the selamlik (the room of reception) was clearly separated from the room of intimate life (haremlik). Thus, the event and the everyday were spatially separate. In this new space configuration, how is the passage of the everyday to the event marked? In order to answer this question, it is necessary to address the genesis of the urban sitting room as a new articulation between intimacy and public representation. It is also relevant to study by which behaviours the event is distinguished from the everyday.

Restricted access

Conflicts in Children’s Everyday Lives

Fresh Perspectives on Protracted Crisis in Lebanon

Erik van Ommering

sustainability of conflict transformation initiatives. Hence, and with an eye on complementing, rather than replacing, more conventional readings of conflict in Lebanon, this article aims to elicit young people’s everyday encounters with some manifestations of

Restricted access

Joanna L. Mosser

Scholars identify the classical and neoliberal commitment to consumption, production, and self-directing individualism as a cultural barrier to ecological thinking and action. The state's complicity in the production of market-based norms and practices hostile to ecological thinking is widely acknowledged. Some solutions, in turn, advocate the liberating force of critical pedagogies that cultivate alternative conceptions of the individual, place, production, consumption, and environment. Missing in this literature is a consideration of the implications of state-based instructional methods for the pursuit of such critical, liberating pedagogies. This article revisits the sovereign territorial state as a modern form of political authority and explores the implications of the state's project of self-authoring standardization and consolidation for the development of ecological thinking and action. The epistemology and ontology of the modern state is rooted in a praxis of subject-hood that dismisses, and constructs as dangerous, the anarchic, self-authoring tendencies of the everyday. Recovering the everyday as a site of authorship, agency, and choice is a first step to creating individuals who take seriously the demands of ecological thinking and action.

Restricted access

Comics and Everyday Life

From Ennui to Contemplation

Greice Schneider

This paper discusses the recent growing presence of the everyday in comics from different traditions, works where ordinary situations and apparently insignificant events take the place of extraordinary worlds and adventure stories. Drawing predominantly from the French perspective of Everyday Studies (Lefebvre, Blanchot, Perec, De Certeau), the ambiguous dynamics of the everyday will be here studied in relation to the contrasting concepts of boredom and strangeness. This paper addresses not only comics that bring these two attitudes as a theme, but also those which manage to awaken emotional responses in the reader, specifically ennui and contemplation. The aim here is to identify different strategies proper to the language of comics capable of arousing everyday moods in the reading experience, particularly in those cases where the temporal dimension is manipulated, reinforcing a sense of slowness.

Restricted access

Ka-Kin Cheuk

fabric trade just went on as usual. Nor did any of the traders or suppliers find the Yiwu Incident remarkable. In fact, they regarded such trade disputes as a typical occurrence in their everyday dealings. Such disputes frequently revolved around issues

Restricted access

Social Quality in Everyday Life

Changing European Experiences of Employment, Family and Community

Sue Yeandle

In this article the concept of 'social quality' is invoked as a way of exploring the impact, relevance and potential of policy and social structural developments for citizens' everyday lives. As a concept, 'social quality' embraces a range of themes each of which has received extensive sociological attention: social cohesion and solidarity as crucial elements in both citizenship and in social institutions such as family, neighbourhood and workplace; autonomy and empowerment as central to the individual's sense of identity and self-worth; economic security, which underpins everyday life and enables people to engage in everyday activities and to approach their future without fear of poverty; and social inclusion, the involvement of individuals in social, economic and cultural aspects of collective life.

Restricted access

Kenneth Bo Nielsen

movement tactics. The quarrel escalated until a senior movement leader intervened to stop it. In this article I use the quarrel at the roadblock as my starting point for a discussion of how an “everyday politics” perspective can enhance our understanding of

Open access

Plastic Packaging, Food Supply, and Everyday Life

Adopting a Social Practice Perspective in Social-Ecological Research

Lukas Sattlegger, Immanuel Stieß, Luca Raschewski and Katharina Reindl

This article presents practice-theoretical conceptions of societal relations to nature as a fruitful alternative to common system approaches in social-ecological research. Via the example of plastic food packaging, two different practice-theoretical approaches to food supply are discussed regarding their suitability for relating the material properties of packaging to their everyday use by producers, retailers, and consumers: (1) the network approach (portraying food supply as a network of practices; these practices include material elements that interrelate with other elements like competence or meaning) and (2) the nexus approach (investigating the interrelation between social practices and material arrangements in which they take place). Depending on the given research interest, both perspectives have their pros and cons: the network approach is stronger in understanding the everyday use of technologies, while the nexus approach encourages the integration of infrastructures and environmental contexts that are not directly observable within the practice.

Restricted access

Islam, IVF and Everyday Life in the Middle East

The Making of Sunni versus Shi'ite Test-Tube Babies

Marcia C. Inhorn

In vitro fertilisation and even newer assisted reproductive technologies are part of everyday life in the contemporary Middle East. There, IVF is practised according to local Islamic norms, which have been reinforced by fatwas from lead- ing religious authorities. As this article will show, ideological differences between dominant Sunni and minority Shi’ite forms of Islam are currently shaping the practices of test-tube baby-making in the Muslim world, particularly regarding the use of third-party gamete donation and new technologies to overcome male infertility. Such divergences have led to gender transformations within infertile marriages in the Muslim Middle East, with potentially profound implications for women’s marital security and family formation.