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Jeanette Edwards

Local family historians in the north of England are not only intent on "finding" their ancestors but in adding "flesh" to the bones of genealogy. Many are as interested in the social life of their ancestors as they are in their family tree or pedigree and, through their research, they excavate particular social and classed histories which combine discourses of land, labor, love, and loss. As well as deepening a sense of the workings of class in England, their research renders class identity more contingent than other contemporary public and media-driven versions. This article argues that family history and genealogical research destabilizes readings of English class identities as fixed, bounded and inescapable by revealing the vagaries of fate and chance and by making explicit other relevant and overlapping social distinctions in the provenance of one's ancestors.

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Family History and Social History

Étienne Davodeau's Reportage of Reality in Les Mauvaises gens

Clare Tufts

This article discusses a bande dessinée that recounts the life story of the artist's parents, factory workers in a deeply conservative milieu who became trade union militants. The article is split into four sections. The first deals with techniques that reinforce the effect of documentary accuracy; the second examines how page layout adds symbolic effects and varies pace and perspective; the third analyses the complex chronology, in which there is not only a shifting between the time of narration and the time of the events recounted, but a further significant temporal displacement relating to the process of narration; the fourth considers the extent to which this biography is also necessarily autobiographical.

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‘Archive Man’

Stephen Poliakoff and the Archive

Elizabeth Robertson

neighbour, and subsequently had to remake and relearn a new family tree. Stephen's passion for using the family archive to discover things about his family history deeply influences the way he presents the archive to his relatives during the family reunion

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Alexandra Senfft

German Family History], 1 I describe the life of my mother. She was the daughter of Hanns Elard Ludin, the envoy of Nazi Germany in Slovakia. It is a family story of loss, denial, concealment and repression. Adorable, dearly loved father – or ugly and

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Migration Destination Choice as a Criterion of Self-Identification

The Case of Young People Leaving Noril’sk and Dudinka

Nadezhda Zamyatina

Abstract

The article is based on a questionnaire distributed among the pupils of eight high schools in the city of Noril’sk, the city possessing the most extreme environmental conditions among the large Russian Arctic cities. Here I claim that the choice of migration direction is based on individual experience and social status. The local geographic myths and institutional environment are also relevant in making these choices. The method of using the geographic preferences and choices as a key to understanding the sociocultural phenomena of the city of Noril’sk provides significant insights. Since the tendency to express the intent to migrate is very strong among Arctic cities’ residents, I propose using such intentions as a new method for studying social processes in the Arctic. The direction of migration plans can also be used as a marker of a person’s social position in the North.

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On separating memory from historical science

A critique and three Austrian cases

Hermann Rebel

To illustrate its critique of a professional-academic practice of separating 'scientific history' from 'popular memory' perceptions, this article examines three examples from current Austrian historiography and memorial constructions. The cases under consideration, all relevant to Austrian historians' representation of the national Holocaust experience, focus firstly, on relationships between present historical perceptions of the Austrian 'foreign police', particularly of the latter's so-called Schubsystem, and their fatal popular memory enactments, both 'then' and 'now'; secondly, on historical-scientific representations of Eastern European family formations as a, possibly ingenuous, popular memory repetition of similar historical-analytical perceptions by Nazi social science; and thirdly, on the selective appearance of the forced labor and death camp Mauthausen in official histories of the Austrian Nazi experience as possible collaborations with the camp's ceremonial restructuring into a ritual object for popular memory engineering that in effect destroys the material evidence of the crime being commemorated.

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The Medium Is the Message

Olivier Schrauwen’s Arsène Schrauwen beyond Expectations of Autobiography, Colonial History and the Graphic Novel

Benoît Crucifix and Gert Meesters

’s imagination at work with the larger Belgian colonial memory. It quickly becomes clear that Arsène Schrauwen stands miles away from the careful archival and documentary work of graphic novelists seeking to recover their family history, a genealogical trope

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Julie Fette

had a chance to peruse family photo albums that I had not seen in years. What I validated through the process was that family history undoubtedly is History. As the reception to Jablonka’s work shows, historians and the public alike are eager to

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The Origins of the Stanley Hoffmann We Knew

Some Comparisons on his Vichy Years with My Family Story

Peter Gourevitch

them. His stories resonated with my family history, though I was not fully conscious of the overlap when I first met Hoffmann. I arrived at Harvard as a graduate student in the fall of 1963 and enrolled in his French Politics class. Hoffmann had

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Introduction

Friends and Family Figures in Contemporary Fiction

Katharine Cockin

During the twentieth century, scientific advances, especially in the field of reproductive technologies, have fundamentally altered ideas about parenting, the family and what it means to be human. In the 1980s, the family became a significant site of political conflict in the UK when family values were defended and so-called pretended families were condemned. New information technologies make it possible for online chat between friends who have never met. Changes in legislation have defined and protected the rights of the child and spectacular campaigns have developed for fathers’ rights. Meanwhile tracing your family history has become one of the most popular hobbies.