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Visible on Our Own Terms

Evoking Girlhood Self-Images Through Photographic Self-Study

Rosalind Hampton and Rachel Desjourdy

Photographic self-study can promote professional growth and deepen analysis of how girlhood experiences such as those related to ability, class, gender, and race are conditioned by and inform our multiple, shifting identities as women. This article presents excerpts from three women's experiences of photographic self-study, highlighting the possibilities of this method as a malleable, feminist approach to critical reflexive practice. Our stories demonstrate how a creative process of self-interpretation, self-representation, and self-knowing can draw oppressive categories of self-identification-carried from girlhood-to the surface and expose them to critique and deconstruction.

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Toxic Research

Political Ecologies and the Matter of Damage

Noah Theriault and Simi Kang

In a world saturated by toxic substances, the plight of exposed populations has figured prominently in a transdisciplinary body of work that we call political ecologies of toxics. This has, in turn, sparked concerns about the unintended consequences of what Eve Tuck calls “damage-centered research,” which can magnify the very harms it seeks to mitigate. Here, we examine what political ecologists have done to address these concerns. Beginning with work that links toxic harm to broader forces of dispossession and violence, we turn next to reckonings with the queerness, generativity, and even protectiveness of toxics. Together, these studies reveal how the fetishization of purity obscures complex forms of toxic entanglement, stigmatizes “polluted” bodies, and can thereby do as much harm as toxics themselves. We conclude by showing, in dialog with Tuck, how a range of collaborative methodologies (feminist, decolonial, Indigenous, and more-than-human) have advanced our understanding of toxic harm while repositioning research as a form of community-led collective action.

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Jennifer Dodge, Richard Holtzman, Merlijn van Hulst, and Dvora Yanow

. Harding , S. ( 1987 ) ‘ Introduction: is there a feminist method? ’ in S. Harding (ed.) Feminism and Methodology , Bloomington, IN : University of Indiana Press , 1 – 14 . hooks , b. ( 1994 ) Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice

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Esther Hertzog

( Jerusalem : Van Leer ), 137 – 152 . Reinharz , S. ( 1992 ), Feminist Methods in Social Research ( Oxford : Oxford University Press ). Shahshahani , S. ( 2014 ), ‘ Hush, Girls Don't Scream by Pouran Derakhshandeh (2013) ’, Anthropology of the