Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,137 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Mirror Neurons and Film Studies

A Cautionary Tale from a Serious Pessimist

Malcolm Turvey

Mirror Neurons and Film Studies: A Brief Introduction Mirror neurons are neurons that fire both when a subject executes a movement and when the subject perceives the same movement executed by another. Since their discovery in the early 1990s

Restricted access

The Changing Portrayal of Dancers in Egyptian Films

Three Roles in the Career of Tahia Carioca (1946, 1958 and 1972)

Carolina Bracco

distinguished themselves from those who fulfilled a social function in popular festivities and low- and middle-class weddings. Dancers in Films: The Early Beginnings When King Farouk succeeded his father in 1936, the Egyptian capital had already

Restricted access

Katie Kirakosian, Virginia McLaurin, and Cary Speck

First offered by the Anthropology Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMA) in 1990, ‘Culture through Film’ (CTF) is taken by between 150 and 300 undergraduates each semester. As an elective general education course taken by

Restricted access

Philip J. Hohle

Popular films like Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds (2009) provide an array of challenging characters all operating with a considerable degree of transgressive agency. Typical of films with a postmodern tone, no single character in

Restricted access

Richard Eldridge

This review essay’s title is partly in homage to Arthur Danto’s well-known essay “Philosophy As/And/Of Literature” (Danto 1984). But this title also helps to organize my comments, both appreciative and critical, and it does so by pointing toward a range of issues about philosophy and film that is similar to a range of issues that have been raised about philosophy and literature. Specifically, I would have liked more attention to philosophy and film. But I am quite ready to admit that my own sensibility here may be extremely idiosyncratic and may present nothing that Thomas Wartenberg needs to or even does disagree with. This suggestion about philosophy and film comes at the end of the essay.

Restricted access

Cynthia Freeland

The following three talks were originally delivered as part of the “Author Meets Critic” session on Thomas E. Wartenberg’s Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy (2007)* at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting in Chicago. The session was sponsored by the Society for the Philosophical Study of the Contemporary Visual Arts on 17 April 2008.

Restricted access

Communism, Consumerism, and Gender in Early Cold War Film

The Case of Ninotchka and Russkii vopros

Rhiannon Dowling

This article deals with ideologies of domesticity, femininity, and consumerism as they were articulated in two films in the early Cold War. These films, shown in occupied Berlin from the spring of 1948 through the first few months of 1949, were Ernst Lubitsch's Hollywood classic Ninotchka (1939) and the Soviet film Russkiivopros (The Russian Question, 1948). They portrayed competing notions of domestic consumption and the “good life” in the aftermath of the Second World War—issues more commonly understood to have characterized the later, thaw-era, years of the conflict. Though they were shown at a time of heightened political and ideological tensions, neither painted a one-dimensional or demonized portrait of the enemy. Instead, both films employed narratives about the private lives and material desires of women in order to humanize their enemies and yet make a statement about the inhuman nature of the other system.

Restricted access

Ira Konigsberg

Film theory has been much involved with psychology, especially with the viewer's perceptual and emotional response to the images on the screen. Psychoanalytic and cognitive film theories, though not exactly kindred spirits, have so far dominated psychological film studies. At the present time, technology offers neuroscience methods to explore the brain that open up the discourse on the mind. This article explains ways in which neuroscience, and its study of the brain, can extend our understanding and theory of film by exploring three areas of our response to cinema. Although the perception of motion is a complicated business, the phenomenon of implied motion suggests the brain's readiness to find movement even when there is none and links together many of the same perceptual mechanisms we use when viewing film and also the world outside the theater. Attention, focus, and binding are essential for us to make sense of the vast amount of stimuli that bombard our eyes. They explain what we see and do not see when viewing film and also the way film technique controls our understanding of the action on the screen. Finally, the argument about what we feel and do not feel when watching the characters on the screen may receive some clarification by neuroscience's investigation of "mirror neurons" in our brain.

Restricted access

Stacie Friend

In Film, Art, and the Third Culture (FATC) , Murray Smith articulates and defends an approach to aesthetics generally, and to film specifically, that exemplifies a naturalized aesthetics . Borrowing C. P. Snow’s (1956) famous terminology, Smith

Restricted access

The Rumble of Nostalgia

Francis Ford Coppola’s Vision of Boyhood

Molly Lewis

In 1983, Francis Ford Coppola presented to the audience of the New York Film Festival a film that he intended to be “an art film for teenagers” ( Coppola 2005 ). Rumble Fish , based on the 1975 novel of the same name by S.E. Hinton, premiered in