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Lyudmila Zhukova

This analysis of the mythical Old Man—a cannibal character in the tales of the Forest Yukaghirs (Odul)—considers the significance of a particular genre of song in Odul folklore. The article highlights discrepancies among the ethical norms that emerge in Odul folklore representing problems faced in everyday life. These tales are interpreted in terms of human/non-human, insider/outsider, attraction/protection, and a number other dichotomies, as well as the form of recitation.

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The Odul Folklore

On the Functional Significance of Shamans

Lyudmila Zhukova

This report reviews various legends, stories, and tales, as well as texts of shamanic rituals recorded by various scholars. The report focuses on the significance and role of a shaman in the Odul (Yukaghir) culture, and summarizes the functions a shaman carried out in the society as presented in these recorded texts.

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Anthropology, Art, and Folklore

Competing Visions of Museum Collecting in Early Twentieth-Century America

Ira Jacknis

wider worlds of museums, anthropology, art, and folklore. Emily Johnston de Forest: Her Life and Collecting Interests Emily Johnston (1851–1942) came to her collecting habits through deep personal connections ( Figure 1 ). Her railroad

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Alexander B. Dolitsky

This review of the traditional narratives of the indigenous people of the Chukchi and Kamchatka Peninsulas identifies major genres, motifs, plots, and subjects found in Siberian Yupik, Chukchi, Kerek, Koryak, and Itelmen narrative folklore, as well as specific features of the folklore of each of the peoples of the Chukotka-Kamchatka region. In addition to discussing the subjects and motifs found in the narrative tales from Chukotka and Kamchatka, the article reviews developments surrounding the typology and classification of oral traditions of the indigenous cultures of the region and the overall value of the tales as a prehistoric and ethnographic source. This survey will be of interest to those fond of traditional narratives of the Russian Far East, as well as to specialists interested in comparative-typological research of oral narratives in anthropology.

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Sharifah Aishah Osman

.070106 Rowe , Karen E . 1986 . “ To Spin a Yarn: The Female Voice in Folklore and Fairy Tale .” In Fairy Tales and Society: Illusion, Allusion, and Paradigm , ed. Ruth Bottigheimer , 53 – 74 . Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press

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The True Story of Gundagai’s Dog on the Tuckerbox

Tourists, Truth, and the Insouciance of Souvenirs

Richard White

was no longer a problem with the souvenir booklet using the word “shat” ( Allnutt 2007 ). The second medium that did not flinch when it came to telling the original story was the writings of folklore collectors: again a medium that put a high premium

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Silke von Lewinski

The possible protection of indigenous cultural expressions has reemerged as a topic in international debates in recent years. This article provides a legal perspective on the topic. Existing copyright and neighboring right laws do not apply to such cultural expressions per se, since they do not fulfill the relevant criteria of protection. However, indirect protection is granted to those who record indigenous expressions onto phonograms, films, and photographs, and for those who collect or perform indigenous cultural expressions. Protection concerning authenticity is possible by way of trademarks (in particular collective marks and certification marks) and geographical indications. Particular rules about unfair competition may protect against the disclosure of confidential information. Works based on traditional cultural expressions are regularly protected by copyright. Following early (unsuccessful) attempts for international protection of traditional cultural expressions per se, new ways are currently being developed including sui generis protection regimes which integrate customary laws and practices. Any successful solution will have to be based on better mutual interest and understanding between indigenous peoples and Western users.

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Linda-May Ballard

This article discusses a range of pragmatic issues associated with curating intangible cultural heritage, including collection, preservation, interpretation, presentation and representation. It uses as a case study work undertaken with Lough Neagh eel fishermen in preparation for and at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 2007, setting this in a much wider curatorial context.

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Zoya Tarasova

Sakha epic songs, collectively called olongkho, embody the Sakha people's religious and mythological traditions. The olongkhos recount fascinating and dramatic connections between humans and deities, and portray ancient Sakha rituals. This article examines the roles of female characters in the epic "N'urgun Bootur the Swift," recorded by Platon Oiunskii. Female roles in this epic include goddesses, female shamans (udaghan), abducted beauties (bride or sister of the hero), and female warriors. The article compares these roles to the historical image of women in past and present Sakha culture, and interprets the underlying message of the olongkho for today's generation.

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The Mutable, the Mythical, and the Managerial

Raven Narratives and the Anthropocene

Thomas F. Thornton and Patricia M. Thornton

The Anthropocene is rooted in the proposition that human activity has disrupted earth systems to the extent that it has caused us to enter a new geological age. We identify three popular discourses of what the Anthropocene means for humanity's future: the Moral Jeremiad admonishes the transgression of planetary boundaries and advocates reductions to live sustainably within Earth's limits; the Technofix Earth Engineer approach depicts the Age of Humanity as an engineering opportunity to be met with innovative technological solutions to offset negative impacts; and the New Genesis discourse advocates re-enchantment of humanity's connections to earth. By contrast, we find that in many indigenous and premodern narratives and myths disseminated across the North Pacific and East Asia, it is the trickster-demiurge Raven that is most closely linked to environmental change and adaptation. Whereas Raven tales among northern Pacific indigenous communities emphasize a moral ecology of interdependence, creative adaptation, and resilience through practical knowledge (mētis), robustly centralizing Zhou Dynasty elites transposed early Chinese Raven trickster myths with tales lauding the human subjugation of nature. Raven and his fate across the northern Pacific reminds us that narratives of environmental crisis, as opposed to narratives of environmental change, legitimate attempts to invest power and authority in the hands of elites, and justify their commandeering of technological xes in the name of salvation.