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Ali Aslam, David McIvor, and Joel Alden Schlosser

Urgent alarms now warn of the erosion of democratic norms and the decline of democratic institutions. These antidemocratic trends have prompted some democratic theorists to reject the seeming inevitability of democratic forms of government and instead to consider democracy as a fugitive phenomenon. Fugitive democracy, as we argue below, is a theory composed of two parts. First, it includes a robust, normative ideal of democracy and, second, a clear-eyed vision of the historical defeats and generic difficulties attendant to that ideal. This article considers how democratic theorists might respond to the challenges posed by fugitive democracy and the implications of such an understanding for future research in democratic theory.

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Israel Abrahams

Master Teacher of Liberal Judaism

Harvey Meirovich

Solomon Schechter departed England in the spring of 1902 to become president of the reorganised Jewish Theological Seminary of America. His post as Reader in Rabbinic and Talmudic Literature at Cambridge University was taken up by 44-year-old Israel Abrahams who remained at the post until his demise at age sixty-seven. Israel Abrahams hailed from a distinguished pedigree. His father Barnett Abrahams served as a Principal of Jews’ College but died from rheumatic fever before his thirty-third birthday. Israel’s mother, born Jane Rodrigues Brandon, traced her family tree to fugitives from the Spanish Inquisition

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Conceptions of Nation and Ethnicity in Swedish Children's Films

The Case of Kidz in da Hood (Förortsungar, 2006)

Anders Wilhelm Åberg

Swedish children's films frequently deal with issues of nation and ethnicity, specifically with “Swedishness”. This may be most obvious in films based on the works of Astrid Lindgren, which abound with nostalgic images of the national culture and landscape. However, films about contemporary Sweden, such as Kidz in da Hood (Förortsungar, 2006) address these issues too. Kidz in da Hood is about children in the ethnically diverse suburbs of Stockholm and it tells the story of a young fugitive, Amina, who is cared for by a young bohemian musician. It is, interestingly, a remake of one of the first Swedish children's films, Guttersnipes (Rännstensungar, 1944). In this article I argue that Kidz in da Hood is a contradictory piece, in the sense that it both celebrates and disavows “Swedishness”, as it substitutes the class conict of Guttersnipes for ethnic conflict.

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Christina Toren

By means of a tale of food poisoning as retribution, this article describes a kind of reasoning that consciously defies commonsense logic. The lived validity of this form of reasoning emphasizes the necessity of an epistemology for anthropology that puts the analysis of relations between people at the heart of our understanding of human reasoning and its ontogeny. An ethnographic analysis of how certain island Fijians give form to kinship relations through the production, exchange, circulation, giving, and consumption of food suggests that it is the very specificity of intersubjective relations between particular persons that make them a proper focus for the anthropologist's attention. It follows that intersubjectivity is central to anthropology as an epistemological project whose fugitive object of study can only be ourselves, even while its focus is bound to be on others.

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Père Marie-Benoît and Joseph Bass

The Rescue of Jews in Marseille and Nice, 1940-1943

Susan Zuccotti

Père Marie-Benoît was a French Capuchin priest who helped rescue thousands of Jews in Marseille, Nice, and Rome during the Holocaust. Unlike most non-Jewish rescuers, however, he worked regularly with courageous, dynamic Jewish men who became close personal friends. This article examines his cooperation with his first Jewish associate, Joseph Bass, who set up the Service André for Jewish rescue in Marseille. With Bass and his assistants, Père Marie-Benoît hid Jews in small units throughout the region; created networks to supply fugitives with food, documents, money, and moral support; enlisted help from sympathetic local bureaucrats; and avoided dependence on large Jewish assistance organizations. Working together, the Jews and non-Jews were much more effective than either group could have been alone. Père Marie-Benoît later applied these techniques to rescue activities in Rome. This article also examines why Père Marie-Benoît became involved in Jewish rescue in the first place, and shows that his wartime experiences determined his subsequent lifelong dedication to Jewish-Christian reconciliation.

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Jeffrey D. Hilmer and Max Halupka

(fugitive democracy), and Chantal Mouffe (agonistic democracy) (131ff.). But they are not without their shortcomings. Participatory theory is increasingly conflated with deliberative theory, thus too narrowly defining political participation (158). It is

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Alison K. Smith

region were now responsible for restricting access to Siberia. Too many fugitive peasants had run away to Siberia over the last few years, and as a result they were paying no rent or taxes to state treasuries. Now their imperial majesties (the law dated

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Fighting Invasive Infrastructures

Indigenous Relations against Pipelines

Anne Spice

build and sustain human life,” and terms the alternatives to state systems “fugitive infrastructures.” While fugitive infrastructure may not be an obvious place to start, anthropology must break from the reification of infrastructure’s stated purpose and

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Matthew Bradney

politics. It is the opportunity for politics’ (pp. 8, 258 emphasis added). I think this is a refreshing change from theories similar to Wolin’s ‘fugitive democracy’ that place emphasis on what Dean calls ‘the politics of the beautiful moment’ (pp. 125

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Terry Gifford, Anna Stenning, David Arnold, Pippa Marland, A.D. Harvey, Christopher North, Michael Conley, Mohammad Shafiqul Islam, and Kate Wise

and sons. Karma rocks up By David Arnold Some of these paths go a long way back. I can’t just snuff them out – still glowing in places where tracer dropped to lodge between the clods of stumbling Mind – Already fugitive, always on the move, unable to