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Open access

Race, Genealogy, and the Genomic Archive in Post-apartheid South Africa

Katharina Schramm

demonstrate the power of evolutionary and contemporary relatedness. Along with archaeology and paleoanthropology, human population genomics featured most prominently in this configuration. In line with new scientific findings that focused on the sequencing

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Ontologies and Politics of Biogenomic 'Race'

Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther and Jonathan Michael Kaplan

All eyes are turned towards genomic data and models as the source of knowledge about whether human races exist or not. Will genomic science make the final decision about whether racial realism (e.g. racial population naturalism) or anti-realism (e.g. racial scepticism) is correct? We think not. The results of even our best and most impressive genomic technologies under-determine whether biogenomic races exist, or not. First, different sub-disciplines of biology interested in population structure employ distinct concepts, aims, measures and models, producing cross-cutting categorisations of population subdivisions rather than a single, universal biogenomic concept of 'race.' Second, within each sub-discipline (e.g. phylogenetics, conservation biology), genomic results are consistent with, and map multiply to, racial realism and anti-realism. Indeed, racial ontologies are constructed conventionally, rather than discovered. We thus defend a constructivist conventionalism about biogenomic racial ontology. Choices and conventions must always be made in identifying particular kinds of groups. Political agendas, social programmes, and moral questions premised on the existence of naturalistic race should accept that no scientifically grounded racial ontology is forthcoming, and adjust presumptions, practices and projects accordingly.

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Wade, Peter. 2017. Degrees of Mixture, Degrees of Freedom: Genomics, Multiculturalism, and Race in Latin America. Duke University Press.

Juan Javier Rivera Andía

Open access

Relative Risk

Measuring Kinship for Future Health in US Genetic Counseling

Anna Jabloner

self-identifications from patients to prognosticate risk and pursue testing and other strategies from such terms of belonging, similar to the self-identification techniques used in South African genomics (Schramm, this issue). Thus, not only are

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Book Reviews

Gregory Mahler, Ami Pedahzur, Ilan Peleg, Morrie Fred, and Louis A. Fishman

its arguments are explicitly and implicitly important for understanding Israeli culture, history, and politics. Ilan Peleg Lafayette College Ian Mcgonigle, Genomic Citizenship: The Molecularization of Identity in the Contemporary Middle

Open access

Book Reviews

Yunnan Ye, Mariske Westendorp, Remus Gabriel Anghel, Dominic Martin, and Dhruv Gautam

time. REMUS GABRIEL ANGHEL National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Romania and Romanian Institute for Research on National Minorities (Romania) McGonigle, Ian. 2021. Genomic Citizenship: The Molecularization of

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Mapping Biotechnology: From Epistemic Artifacts to Geographies of Control

Michael S. Carolan

This article maps key epistemological and ontological terrains associated with biotechnology. Beginning with the epistemological, a comparison is made between the scientific representations of today, particularly as found in the genomic sciences, and the scientific representations of the past. In doing this, we find these representations have changed over the centuries, which has been of significant consequence in terms of giving shape to today's global political economy. In the following section, the sociopolitical effects of biotechnology are discussed, particularly in terms of how the aforementioned representations give shape to global path dependencies. By examining the epistemological and ontological assumptions that give shape to the global distribution of informational and biological resources, this article seeks to add to our understanding of today's bioeconomy and the geographies of control it helps to create.

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Governing through the Brain

Neuropolitics, Neuroscience and Subjectivity

Nikolas Rose and Joelle Abi-Rached

This article considers how the brain has become an object and target for governing human beings. How, and to what extent, has governing the conduct of human beings come to require, presuppose and utilize a knowledge of the human brain? How, and with what consequences, are so many aspects of human existence coming to be problematized in terms of the brain? And what role are these new 'cerebral knowledges' and technologies coming to play in our contemporary forms of subjectification, and our ways of governing ourselves? After a brief historical excursus, we delineate four pathways through which neuroscience has left the lab and became entangled with the government of the living: psychopharmacology, brain imaging, neuroplasticity and genomics. We conclude by asking whether the 'psychological complex' of the twentieth century is giving way to a 'neurobiological complex' in the twenty-first, and, if so, how the social and human sciences should respond.

Open access

Affective Cartographies of Collective Blame

Mediating Citizen–State Relations in Aotearoa/New Zealand and Australia during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Susanna Trnka and L. L. Wynn

outbreaks resulted in government press conferences detailing who was infected, how they might have become infected and which genomic sequence of COVID-19 they were suffering from. While the infected were not named, the media provided identifying details: a

Open access

Introduction

Measuring Kinship, Negotiating Belonging

Tatjana Thelen and Christof Lammer

( Tyler 2021 ). 3 Katharina Schramm (this issue) unpacks the notion of ‘genomic archive’, which is supposed to prove the unity of the post-apartheid South African nation by demonstrating that its underlying institutionalized practices of sampling