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Remaking Oceans Governance

Critical Perspectives on Marine Spatial Planning

Luke Fairbanks, Noëlle Boucquey, Lisa M. Campbell, and Sarah Wise

movements. Rather than focus on managing individual sectors such as fishing, shipping, or marine protected areas, MSP seeks to integrate those traditionally disconnected management arrangements through a vision of rational and comprehensive governance

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Navigating Shifting Regimes of Ocean Governance

From UNCLOS to Sustainable Development Goal 14

Ana K. Spalding and Ricardo de Ycaza

, reflecting a pattern of intensification of historical ocean uses” ( Juda 2003: 161 ). Growing intensity and diversity of activities in the ocean at a global level triggered the development of a complex ocean governance framework. However, its large

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Racialized Governance

The Production and Destruction of Secure Spaces in Olympic Rio de Janeiro

Margit Ystanes and Alexandre Magalhães

dominant conceptualizations of the citizenry, and the destruction of life conditions in favela territories in the name of societal improvement, constitute a form of racialized governance. It is important to note that the racialization of favela territories

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Governing the Sun

The Challenges of Geoengineering

Klaus Radunsky and Tim Cadman

unable or unwilling to take concerted action, calling into question the legitimacy of intergovernmentalism as a means of global governance ( Gale 2013 ; Goyal 2015 ). Various assessments conclude that the risks of not meeting either the 1.5°C or the 2

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Charlotte Prové, Denise Kemper, and Salma Loudiyi

al. 2015 ; Renting and Wiskerke 2010 ). Second, we can observe that UA is increasingly being discussed from a more aggregate level in networks or governance platforms. This is the case, for instance, when UA stakeholders build strategic partnerships

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Eliana Elisabeth Diehl and Esther Jean Langdon

“interculturality”, defined as articulation and mutual respect in different sociocultural settings ( Brasil, 2002a ; Coelho & Shankland, 2011 ). Specific strategies and roles were introduced to guarantee political participation and governance through the creation

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Governing Religious Multiplicity

The Ambivalence of Christian-Muslim Public Presences in Post-colonial Tanzania

Hansjörg Dilger

public and institutional settings, occurs especially on the level of national and transnational governance, and often in irregular and ambivalent ways. I also demonstrate that the governing of religious multiplicity in Tanzania has to be understood with

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Anatomy of a disaster

The neo-liberal state in Mumbai's 2005 flood

Judith Whitehead

This article discusses the networked forms of governance that have arisen as part of roll-out neo-liberal policies in Mumbai, India, focusing on the flood of 26 July 2005 and its aftermath. The municipal government's inaction during and after the flood is attributed to the decentralization of governance, as well as to cutbacks to public health and basic services in recent years. The rise of competitive urbanism as a part of roll-out neo-liberalism is analyzed as producing gaps in disaster management planning and implementation. The article concludes with a call for a refinanced state and a centralization of municipal bodies under a unified municipal council, seen as necessary to provide the professionalized services required during large-scale emergencies such as floods.

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Timo Pankakoski and Antto Vihma

Fragmentation has become a key concept in the analysis of international law and global governance in recent years. For many, fragmentation has both positive and negative aspects, but scholars are divided over which aspect is predominant. The

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Even governmentality begins as an image

Institutional planning in Kuala Lumpur

Richard Baxstrom

This article considers the complexity of contemporary urban life in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, through an analysis of planning and the plan itself as a thing in this environment of multiplicity. It argues that the plan functions as a vehicle for action in the present that does not require a singular vision of the future in order to succeed. Plans in the context of governance and urban development gesture to “the future,” but this gesture does not require “a future” in order to function in a highly effective manner. The evidence presented indicates that the primary effectiveness of the plan largely relates to its status as a virtual object in the present. Such virtual objects (plans) bind subjects to the conditions of the present within the desires and limits asserted by the institutions seeking to dominate contemporary life in the city, but this domination is never absolute, singular, or complete.