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Dani Filc

The language of rights is increasingly used to regulate access to health care and allocation of resources in the health care field. The right to health has been grounded on different theories of justice. Scholars within the liberal tradition have grounded the right to health care on Rawls's two principles of justice. Thus, the right to health care has been justified as being one of the basic liberties, as enabling equality of opportunity, or as being justified by the maximin principle. In this article, Filc analyzes—from a radical egalitarian standpoint—the limitations of the different attempts to ground an equal right to health on Rawls's theory of justice and offers a first approximation to a radical egalitarian formulation of the right to health.

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Saudi Patients and Health Care Providers

Divergent Perceptions of Illnesses and Their Symptoms

Mohamed Harakati, Faissal Shaheen, Hani Tamim, Saadi Taher, Adel Al. Qublan, and Abdulla Al Sayyari

This cross-sectional survey study analyses the degree of concordance between Saudi patients and their nurses and physicians in four areas: (1) perceived causation of diseases and drivers of cure, (2) symptom ranking and perception, (3) views on social habits and traditional medicine, and (4) assessment of health care providers' empathy. The doctors and nurses were asked to predict their patients' responses to the survey. Significant divergence was found between the patients' responses and the health care providers' predictions. Cultural and background differences between the two groups, as well as a large educational gap, might account for this disparity. Such discordance could conceivably lead to wrong diagnoses being made, due to the different levels of importance that patients and doctors accord to symptoms.

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High-tech Romania?

Commoditisation and Informal Relations in the Managerialist Informatisation of the Romanian Health-Care System

Sabina Stan and Valentin-Veron Toma

While informatisation has officially been hailed as a major component of the modernisation of the Romanian health-care system, this paper, based on ethnographic research in Romanian hospitals, shows that it has been mostly geared towards managerialist goals of administrative control and cost containment. Paradoxically, informal relations, which were supposed to be suppressed as a result of both informatisation and managerialist marketisation, continue to thrive in the Romanian health-care system.

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Images of Care, Boundaries of the State

Volunteering and Civil Society in Czech Health Care

Rosie Read

This article examines how boundaries of the state are negotiated and projected in Czech health care volunteering. Hospital regimes and the professional care provided by doctors and nurses are widely imagined as a domain of intensified state authority, a legacy of state socialism. I explore attempts by NGO actors, hospitals, and local government officials involved in three Czech volunteer programs to create alternative, non-medicalized forms of patient care as civil society, thereby reproducing the boundary between state and non-state that characterized civil society discourses of the 1990s in the region. Yet unlike those discourses and the anthropological analyses they have informed, this process of boundary making does not constitute the state and civil society as inevitably antagonistic or competitive entities.

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Bayla Ostrach

unique effects in Catalunya, where migrants have greater access to public health care ( Ostrach 2017 ). The 2010 reforms expanded abortion rights for any reason in the first trimester (up to 14 weeks from the last menstrual period, by this law

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Andrew Ward

The nature of health care, a multifaceted system of reimbursements, subsidies, levels of care, and trade-offs between economics, values and social goods, makes it both a problematic area of policy and critical to the well-being of society. In the United States, provision of health care is not a right as in some countries, but occurs as a function of a complex set of cross-subsidized mechanisms that, according to some analysts, exclude from coverage those who may be in the most need of it. Accordingly, this article examines some of the issues involved in making decisions on how to justly expand health insurance.

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Beyond Frames

The Creation of a Dance Company in Health Care through the Journey of Brain Trauma

Jenny Elliott

This article is about my very personal pursuit of drawing down meaning and subsequently evaluating the impact of my professional contemporary dance practice within a specific trauma recovery health-care environment. By tracing a series of short dance journeys, through a hospital ward, artist retreat, hospital dance studio, and local theatre, the intimate story of my role as a PhD researcher, choreographer, and dance facilitator within a neuro-behavioral rehabilitation unit located within a psychiatric site in Belfast unfolds. Lying within the creases of these journeys are the developments of a practice performance-based methodology that coaxes a group of seven men with enduring brain injury who are residents in the neuro-behavioral rehabilitation unit and three staff who care for them to participate together in a four-week Laban-based dance training programme and performance. One of the intentions of the program is to develop a dance company for a PhD study. The article reflects on the embodied experiences of my dance practice and their impact on the generation of appropriate dance-based methodology, analysis frameworks that were subsequently used to investigate this participatory model of arts engagement within health care. The article is back-dropped against my fifteen-year dance residency in health care and the current surge in provision of arts in health-care programs.

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Paul Bissell

Although community pharmacists have a well-established and culturally acknowledged role supplying medicines, the reconfiguration of occupational boundaries within healthcare in England and other countries (Charles-Jones et al. 2003) has resulted in increasing policy and professional interest in developing the role of the pharmacist in a number of areas. Whilst many of the new roles for pharmacists involve the sale or supply of medicines by different means (for example, via patient group directions or pharmacist prescribing) and are mainly aimed at improving access to medicines, other suggested developments shift community pharmacy practice into rather more unfamiliar territory. In particular, there is now increasing interest in the role that pharmacists might play in public health, and the term ‘pharmaceutical public health’ is increasingly heard within practice research circles and pharmacy policy more generally, both in the UK and abroad (Boorman et al. 2001; Anderson et al. 2003; Jones et al. 2004). For example, the Department of Health in England has devoted considerable attention to the idea of pharmaceutical public health.

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The Politics of Vodou

AIDS, Access to Health Care and the Use of Culture in Haiti

Catherine Benoît

During the past few years, the AIDS campaign in Haiti has been targeting Vodou officiants and organizations. These awareness and training programmes inform officiants about the transmission and prevention of AIDS, tests for HIV and antiretroviral drugs, or even try to encourage them to become involved in a medical referral system. These culturalist interventions are grounded in an essentialist concept of culture that can have harmful effects on the targeted groups. The concept of culture underlying such interventions is deconstructed along with the categories of traditional medicine and the 'tradipractitioner'. An approach to public health is advocated that would contextualize medical pluralism in Haiti.

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Yassaba’ or the Fear of Being Abandoned

Health Promotion Messages and Local Meanings in Guinea

Maria Cristina Manca

), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and European Union-based researchers who funded mobile laboratories in Guéckédou and helped to set up prevention strategies, contact tracing, health care and other activities. 1 MSF had been working in Guinea since 2001 and in