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Sarah C. Hunter and Damien W. Riggs

Books published on fathering and raising boys are becoming increasingly popular. These books claim simply to describe boys and fathers. However we suggest that they make only specific identities available. We make this suggestion on the basis of a critical analysis of six books published since an initial study by Riggs (2008). In this article we extend Riggs’s analysis by identifying how the books analyzed draw upon hegemonic masculine ideals in constructing boys’ and fathers’ identities. The analysis also suggests that biological essentialism is used to justify the identities constructed. Five specific implications are drawn from the findings, focusing on understandings of males as well as females, the uptake of dominant modes of talking about males, and the ramifications of biological essentialism. The findings emphasize the need to pay ongoing attention to popular parenting books since, rather than offering improved strategies for raising boys, these books present assertions of what boys and fathers should be.

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Robyn Singleton, Jacqueline Carter, Tatianna Alencar, Alicia Piñeirúa-Menéndez, and Kate Winskell

-Vázquez 2000 ); consequently, there is a dearth of qualitative research exploring young adolescents’—especially those from rural areas—sense-making around masculinities. The concept of hegemonic masculinity ( Connell 1995 ; Connell and Messerschmidt 2005

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Amrita De

controlling working-class lives and subjectivities. Within this framework, Connell associates hegemonic masculinity with those who control the dominant institutions of the world gender order—“the business executives who operate in global markets, and the

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Fashioning Masculinities through Migration

Narratives of Romanian Construction Workers in London

Alexandra Urdea

in Singapore, I follow the “social reproduction of … workers as men, conditioned through their position in the division of labour” (2014: 1015), generating new forms of hegemonic masculinities. R.W Connell and James W Messerschmidt's notion of

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Eluding the Esculacho

A Masculinities Perspective on the Enduring Warrior Ethos of Rio de Janeiro's Police

Celina Myrann Sørbøe

salaries, including bonuses, were insufficient to sustain their families ( Musumeci 2015 ). “Doing Gender” and Hegemonic Masculinity In order to discuss the gendered performances of police officers, it is first necessary to look at what is meant by

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Becoming a Super-Masculine “Cool Guy”

Reflexivity, Dominant and Hegemonic Masculinities, and Sexual Violence

James W. Messerschmidt

of the adolescent boys (see Messerschmidt 2016 for the full life story )—which is the subject of this article—reveals a close relationship among in-school bullying, reflexivity, embodiment, and dominant and hegemonic masculinities in understanding

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A New Kind of Monster, Cowboy, and Crusader?

Gender Hegemony and Flows of Masculinities in Pixar Animated Films

Elizabeth Al-Jbouri and Shauna Pomerantz

's welcome “new man” features have obscured prevailing hegemonic masculinities that continue to demonstrate dominant gender norms. Just how “new” is Pixar's “new man,” and how far does Pixar go in changing definitions of available masculinities? In what

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Negotiating Identities

Being “Boy,” Being “Filipino,” Being “Other”

Victoria Cann

particular contexts. In terms of hegemonic masculinity during youth, Stephen Frosh and colleagues have noted the ways in which masculinity within youth culture continues to be rigidly constrained within homophobic rhetoric and the assertion of “‘normal

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"From the Top on Down It Is Systemic"

Bullying, Privilege and the Schooling of Hegemonic Masculinity

Brett G. Stoudt

In order to better understand the socialization and (re)production of privilege, most especially gendered privilege, within elite independent schools it is important to examine the masculine performances of its students enacted through bullying as well as the masculine environments in which these enactments are produced. This paper will begin explicating the messages received and the representations shaped by Rockport’s hegemonic masculine curriculum and the embodiment of these dynamics through research on bullying conducted with students and faculty at an elite, single-sex independent boys school, Rockport. The data revealed that bullying between boys at Rockport helped to discipline and reproduce hegemonic masculine boundaries; it was as much an expression of Rockport’s culture as it was a vehicle for policing and reproducing its culture. However, not only were the boys within Rockport gendered, the faculty and even the institution itself was gendered. In this way, it was systemic, both students and faculty acted within this institutional culture and held and managed expectations about their gender.

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“Why Do We Ask Them About Their Gender, If We Then Go on to Do Nothing with It?”

Constructions of Masculinity in Youth Justice in England and Wales

Eric Baumgartner

, building on notions of Raewyn Connell's concept of hegemonic masculinity ( Connell and Messerschmidt 2005 ). Suzanne Hatty (2000) explains that aggression and violence come to be socially conditioned ideas, whereby males hold an entitlement to aggression