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Heritage

Renovation, Relocation, Remediation, and Repositioning Museums

Mary Bouquet

This article examines the changing relationship between museums and heritage using a number of Dutch cases. It argues that if heritage was once defined as being museological in character, this order of precedence is under revision as museums themselves are recursively transformed by heritage dynamics. Such dynamics include the display of renovation work-in-progress; the enhancement of historical collections by relocation to prominent new sites and buildings; the transformation of old industrial sites into new art and public spaces; and a mutual reinforcement between the urban landscape setting and the institutions that compose it by virtual means. Postcolonial heritage practices worldwide enfold museums in a further set of transformatory dynamics: these include claims on cultural property that was removed in colonial times, but also the strategic transformation of cultural property into heritage for didactic purposes. Museums are subject to the recursive dynamics of heritage, which are turning them inside out.

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Tuuli Lähdesmäki, Sigrid Kaasik-Krogerus, and Katja Mäkinen

The idea of heritage has gained new political momentum in a postmillennial Europe that has faced various political, economic, social, and humanitarian challenges and crises that influence how Europeans deal with the past, present, and future and

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The Politics of Indigeneity and Heritage

Indonesian Mortuary Materials and Museums

Kathleen M. Adams

In recent decades, museum studies scholarship has highlighted ways in which museums and museum-like heritage spaces are key arenas for articulating, negotiating, and amplifying identities, and for advancing particular (re-)visions of intergroup

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Elizabeth C. Macknight

This article presents two case studies, from Scotland and the Scottish Islands, of communities' engagement with archives and their attitudes toward heritage. The case studies arise out of knowledge transfer between an historian employed in an academic role at a Scottish university and two “third sector“ organizations. By comparing the perspectives of historians, archivists, and community organizations the article shows the different ways in which these separate interest groups perceive the value of archives. It then points to some of the possibilities and challenges of working collaboratively to deepen understanding about the past and to create wider opportunities, now and in the future, for historical interpretation, teaching, learning, and research. In the era of digital technologies, it is recommended that undergraduate students be taught the key concepts of archival theory and practice, while also being encouraged to experience working with original archival documents.

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Reclaiming European Heritages of Transatlantic Migration

The Politics of Identity of East European Immigrants to the U.S.A.

Vytis Čiubrinskas

This article provides a fieldwork-based case study for the application of identity empowerment through heritage as a research perspective for the analysis of East European transnationalism seen in Lithuanian immigration in the U.S.A. Two patterns of reclaiming European heritages, 'diasporic' and 'recognitionist', are discussed. The 'diasporic' pattern among more recent migrants embraces a transatlantic heritage in which culture stands for the nation. It is instrumentalised as a claim to retain essential Lithuanianness, and reinforced by the moral imperative to return to the homeland. The 'recognitionist' pattern is exemplified by descendants of earlier East European immigrants, and is focused on family roots, as well as on ethnic history and culture. Transatlantic roots and ethnic heritages of the Lithuanian 'Texas pioneers' are reinforced by belonging to the local United States as migrants strive to achieve re-inscription of that heritage as one that has long been rooted in the local history of Texas.

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Agonistic Interpretation

A New Paradigm in Response to Current Developments

Nicole Deufel

Heritage interpretation, or interpretation in short, is arguably one of the most visible and impactful professional heritage management practices that visitors encounter in museums and at heritage sites. As an applied practice, interpretation is

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Transforming Museums and Heritage in Postcolonial and Post-Apartheid South Africa

The Impact of Processes of Policy Formulation and New

Gerard Corsane

In post-apartheid South Africa, the traditional understandings of museums and heritage have been challenged in terms of how meaning making, heritage construction, and knowledge production were conducted in the colonial past. In a series of processes of transformation, new approaches to museum action and heritage management have begun to take shape and develop in South Africa. Central to all of this have been the processes of policy formulation and new legislation that have provided the impetus for change. The aim of this article is to briefly chart some of these processes and the subsequent legislation that have begun to affect the ways in which South African heritage and museums are being reconfigured in a postcolonial and post-apartheid era. This policy formulation and the new legislation have focused on extending what is considered to be heritage by including intangible cultural heritage. It has also looked at empowering local communities, with an emphasis on sustainable development.

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Ambiguous Attachments and Industrious Nostalgias

Heritage Narratives of Russian Old Believers in Romania

Cristina Clopot

memory central for the heritage narratives of Old Believers in Romania today that will be discussed in this essay. It is this relationship with a mythical past and the various forms in which it is embodied in current heritage practices that is of concern

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Heritage or hate?

A pedagogical guide to the confederate flag in post-race America

Cameron D. Lippard

racism. Newport (2000) also reported that by 2000, when boycotts against Southern states displaying the flag resurged, attitudes had changed to 59 per cent of Americans viewing it as representing ‘Southern pride’ (White Southern cultural heritage) and 28

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Curating Conflict

Four Exhibitions on Jerusalem

Sa'ed Atshan and Katharina Galor

“The heritage of Jerusalem is indivisible, and each of its communities has a right to the explicit recognition of their history and relationship with the city. To deny, conceal or erase any of the Jewish, Christian, or Muslim traditions