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Fatima Zahra Bessedik

At home. But the soul finds its own home if it has a home at all. —Marilynne Robinson, Home In Marilynne Robinson’s Home (2008), Jack, the principal character of the story, goes back to his dwelling place after twenty years of absence. By

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Representing the Sensory Home

Ethnographic Experience and Anthropological Hypermedia

Sarah Pink

In this article I draw from my research about gender, identity, and the home, to discuss the visual and the other senses in ethnographic experience and anthropological representation. First, I discuss how visual ethnographic research might appreciate the sensory nature of experience. Seeing the home as both the context and subject of field- work, I shall introduce the idea of the ‘sensory home’. This refers to the home as a domain composed of different sensory elements (smell, touch, taste, vision, sound) that is simultaneously understood and created through the sensory experience and manipulation of these elements. I then explore how such visual and sensory research might best be represented as text that is conversant with mainstream anthropology. I shall suggest that while film and writing have both tackled this theme, hypermedia offers new possibilities that might bridge the gap between written and visual anthropology.

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Susanne Højlund

Based on fieldwork in Danish children's homes, this article examines how the idea of 'home' has emerged and become integrated in institutional practices. The ideal of hominess serves as a positive model for sociality in the institution, but at the same time it also produces dilemmas, paradoxes, and contradictions for both children and social workers. These dilemmas stem from the conflicting values of institution and home. Nevertheless, the two spheres should not be seen as spaces with incompatible logics; rather, they should be viewed as mutually dependent but competing ideas (and practices) that are inherent in the institutional value hierarchy. The article argues that the ideal of authenticity plays a central role in the way that hominess is perceived as a positive value in children's homes—and perhaps in institutions in general.

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Suranjana Choudhury

The Partition of 1947 is a seminal episode in the history of the Indian subcontinent. Partition is still a living reality; it continues to define the everydayness of lives in the partitioned states. Memory is an important topic in the field of Partition Studies: the act of remembering and the subject of remembrance illuminate our understanding of Partition in more ways than one. Personal memories hold special significance in this regard. This article comprises two personal memory pieces on the cascading effects of Partition in individuals’ lives. The first story is a retelling of my grandmother’s experience of displacement and her subsequent relocation in newly formed India. The story brings forth memories associated with her wedding jewelry box, which she brought with her across the border. The second story focuses on the life experiences of my domestic helper, a second generation recipient of Partition memories.

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Giving Aid Inside the Home

Humanitarian House Visits, Performative Refugeehood, and Social Control of Syrians in Jordan

Ann-Christin Wagner

refugees who had just survived the dangerous crossing of the Mediterranean. In Mafraq, however, Syrians’ exile had long turned into protracted displacement. Inside their humble homes, Syrians spent many days waiting for aid workers to come and visit. House

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Julia D. Harrison

Touristic travel is about ‘going away’ and ‘coming home.’ In what follows I offer some reflection on how a group of middle and uppermiddle class Canadian tourists imagined ‘home’ in the context of their frequent travels ‘away’ – a group I have labelled ‘travel enthusiasts.’ I position these imaginings in relation to others who travel around the globe, those I am calling ‘transnationals’ – the migrants, the refugees, the exiles and the immigrants of the postmodern world.

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Making Multitemporality with Houses

Time Trickery, Ethical Practice and Energy Demand in Postcolonial Britain

Roxana Moroşanu

originated in, or are aesthetically suggested by, multiple times provided the background for imagining the future rather than being an obstacle to its emergence. Making multitemporality in and with one’s home reveals agency in creating alternative

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Thebes Troutman as Traveling Tween

Revising the Family Story

Margaret Steffler

apart. Both characters are vulnerable as they search for love, home, and a place to belong. Ostensibly upbeat and outgoing, Anne and Thebes also experience dark moments of feeling unloved, misunderstood, and unwanted. Anne contributed to stable notions

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“Home Is Home No Longer”

Political Struggle in the Domestic Sphere in Postarmistice Hungary, 1919-1922

Emily R. Gioielli

groups, namely, homes, apartment buildings, and neighborhoods, this article shows how different politically marginalized groups, including women and the working classes, participated in and negotiated the political transformations of post—World War I

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‘People-Place-Process’ and Attachment in the Museum

A New Paradigm for Understanding Belonging?

Susannah Eckersley

conceptualisation of belonging and ‘home’. At the same time, it seeks to uncover and analyse how different groups with backgrounds relating to historical forced migration and displacement may feel towards the same place, and why their sense of belonging ‘attaches