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Accounting for Imaginary Presence

Husserl and Sartre on the Hyle of Pure Imagination

Di Huang

intuitive appearance. However, the difference between imaginary presence and perceptual presence is no less remarkable. First of all, imaginary presence is penetrated by a profound sense of absence ; far from being contradictory, the two characteristics

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Daniel O'Shiel

—sense is often hardly cognisable for many average believers, Sartre's phenomenological conception of the imaginary can be crucial for us to try and capture various aspects of God, which, however, equally gives us the tendency to pervert potentially more

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Spatializing Radical Political Imaginaries

Neoliberalism, Crisis, and Transformative Experience in the Syntagma Square Occupation in Greece

Dimitris Soudias

radical political imaginaries in these encampments. First, this is because the extraordinary practice of occupying is an act against the ordering of the status quo vis-à-vis the neoliberalization of everyday life in Greece. And second, the social order

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Kathleen Lennon

Sartre’s Imaginary Personages In his early work The Imaginary , 1 Sartre discusses the performance artist Franconay, ‘a small stout brunette woman’ who is imitating Maurice Chevalier. In this performance ‘that black hair we did not see as black

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Alexa, Affect, and the Algorithmic Imaginary

Addressing Privacy and Security Concerns Through Emotional Advertising

Linda Kopitz

life. In this context, the underlying messages of these commercials have the potential to shape the “algorithmic imaginary” as “the way in which people imagine, perceive and experience algorithms and what these imaginations make possible” ( Bucher 2017

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Representations of Women in the French Imaginary

Historicizing the Gallic Singularity

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

* This forum began as a roundtable for the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies that took place in Washington, DC, in April 2017. Tracy Adams conceptualized the session under the original title “Women in the French Imaginary

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Paul-François Tremlett

In the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012, the Occupy London protests, informed by the ideal of a moral, territorially defined community, caught the imagination of British and global publics. For a short while, this moral imaginary was mobilized to contest some of the most glaring contradictions of the neo-liberal city. I argue that the Occupy protests in London registered a sense of public outrage at the violation of certain 'sacred' norms associated with what it means to live with others. More concretely, I contend that Occupy London was an experiment initiated to open out questions of community, morality, and politics and to consider how these notions might be put to work. These questions were not merely articulated intellectually among expert interlocutors. They were lived out through the spatially and temporally embodied occupation of urban space.

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Tension between Fast and Slow Mobilities

Examining the Infrastructuring Processes in Brussels (1950–2019) through the Lens of Social Imaginaries

Claire Pelgrims

This article analyzes the dialectic of fast and slow mobilities as a continuous tension, since the mid-twentieth century, characterized by three evolutions of the functional, phenomenological, and social dimensions of mobility infrastructure and practices in Brussels, Belgium. It is based on the content analysis of diverse “embodiments” of social imaginaries: mobility infrastructures, narratives and sensory-motor behaviors, and images, movies, and photographs. It casts light on the great triple evolution of (1) the scale of the designed city; (2) the limits between spaces devoted to speed, slowness, and overlaps; and (3) the promoted aesthetics in terms of atmospheres and urban experience. These developments strongly relate to the changing meaning of slow and fast mobilities and to a broader change in the societal relationship to space and time.

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Cècile Mathieu

Translator : Matthew Roy

for considering these post-World War I cultural imaginaries. I will examine the question of otherness in this dictionary through the study of ethnonyms (names of peoples or ethnic groups) and demonyms or gentilics (names for residents or natives of a

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Mark J.P. Wolf

Just as perceptual gestalten complete images and narrative gestalten complete storylines, both encouraging audiences to fill in missing information based on the information provided, the data pertaining to an imaginary world can collectively generate a world logic that helps audiences extrapolate and fill in gaps, resulting in the illusion of a complete and consistent imaginary world, through we what might call world gestalten. This article examines how these gestalten occur and function, how they contribute to the illusion of a complete world, and the importance of this process to transmedial entertainment franchises that are set in imaginary worlds.