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Steve Reyna

This essay is concerned with where the current of global political and economic events runs. It addresses this concern by erecting an argument in three stages. First, a string being theory (SBT) is outlined. Second, this theory is used to formulate an SBT approach to imperialism, one that might be imagined as Lenin by alternative (theoretical) means, emphasizing the role of violent force. The 'seven deadly sirens'—generalizations that predict the exercise of violent force under different conditions in imperial systems—are introduced. Third, certain post-1945 US government uses of violence are analyzed in terms of their fit with the seven sirens' predictions. Oil depletion is considered as contributing to systemic crisis in capital accumulation, and its role in Gulf War II is explored. It is concluded that US government violence is consistent with the sirens' predictions. The essay terminates with speculation about where the current runs.

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Republican Imperialisms

Narrating the History of “Empire” in France, 1885–1900

Christina Carroll

harness the force of its empire more effectively, as each colony would “freely” contribute its energies toward French goals. 2 In these articles, Saint-Paul worked to reclaim the terms “empire” and “imperialism” from Bonapartist politics. He likely did so

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“Space without People”

Austro-German Filmmaker, Bestselling Author, and Journalist Colin Ross Discovers Australia

Siegfried Mattl

context of modern technology, education, science, media revolution, identity-production, and colonialism or imperialism ( Ruoff 2006 ). Jennifer Peterson in her analysis of early American travel films went further by ascribing a kind of resistance to non

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Samuel Moyn and Jean-Paul Gagnon

necessity and choice. The experience of modern imperialism and global Cold War competition had the effect of eradicating most competition ideologically – the ecosystem, as it were, got winnowed down substantially, since the war was over the exact form of

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Invoking a World of Ideas

Theory and Interpretation in the Justification of Colonialism

David Boucher

circumstances, but the veracity of the arguments depend on the constellation of ideas as a whole. The history of the European colonisation of non-European territories and subsequent policies of imperialism illustrate a general tendency, which appears in many

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Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi

space for the ideology of pan-Africanism. The central argument of the article, however, is that the developmental paradigm driving pan-Africanism gives support to Western imperialism, which stands against the ultimate dream of pan-Africanism. The

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Introduction

What can Transnational Studies offer the analysis of localized conflict and protest?

Nina Glick Schiller

After reviewing the strengths and limitations of Transnational Studies, including its methodological nationalism, this article calls for the field to develop a theory of power. A transnational theory of power allows us to set aside binaries such as internal/external, global/local, or structure/agency, when analyzing historical and contemporary social processes and conflicts. Previous and current scholarship on imperialism can contribute to this project by facilitating the examination of the role of finance capitalists and of states of unequal financial and military power. However, Transnational Studies also must assess the contestatory possibilities of transnational social movements. The articles in this special section contribute to the development of Transnational Studies by examining past and present transnational constructions of locality, identity, authenticity, and voice, within social fields of uneven power. The articles also illuminate the types of transnational practices, conflict, and struggle that emerge. v

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The Traveling Model That Would Not Travel

Oil, Empire, and Patrimonialism in Contemporary Chad

Stephen P. Reyna

This article concerns a type of change involving implementation of 'traveling models'—procedural cultural plans of how to do some-thing done somewhere elsewhere. Specifically, it concerns the World Bank's traveling model of oil revenue distribution in support of Chadian development. It finds that this model is failing and that dystopia is developing in its stead. A contrasting explanation, which examines the contradictions and consequences of Chadian patrimonialism and US imperialism, is proposed to account for this state of affairs. Finally, the analysis is shown to have implications for conceptualizing patrimonialism and planning development.

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Gargi Gangopadhyay

understanding, 1851], 9th ed. (Kolkata: 1857) . 32 Dutta, Charupath , Part II, 2. 33 Henry Schwarz and Gauri Viswanathan refer to the hegemonic constructions in these texts as “aesthetic imperialism” and “masks of conquest.” See Henry Schwarz, “Aesthetic

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Eyewitness Accounts during the Putumayo Rubber Boom

Manuel Antonio Mesones Muro—the Madman of the Marañon River, Cárlos Oyague y Calderón—the State Engineer, and Roger Casement—Not of the Real World Humanitarian

Rupert J. M. Medd and Hélène Guyot

Between 1870 and 1915 Peru experienced a rubber-boom, extending into the Putumayo River region in 1893. This huge region of Amazonian forests was controlled by the Peruvian Amazon Company (P. A. Co.). Although Peruvian, they had British company directors and a British-Barbadian workforce. Their methods of extraction generated unimaginable degrees of human and ecological violence. Roger Casement, a British diplomat, was sent on a harrowing mission to investigate these allegations made by travelers. His Amazon Journal takes precedence; however, Peruvians also responded to the situation, reporting to the Geographical Society of Lima. Included are two forgotten yet influential Peruvian explorers: the geographer Manuel Antonio Mesones Muro and the engineer Cárlos Oyague y Calderón. By highlighting some of the early debates that circulated between Europe and Latin America on the natural resources and people of the Amazon forests, the focus is to draw out textual examples of perceptions on race, environment, and early consumer responsibility. Supported by coloniality/modernity theories, it also asks whether this form of travel writing was functioning as a resistance literature to imperialism for the time. Thus, this study investigates alternative readings that might also inform twenty-first-century scholars and activists as they articulate environmentalist and even social and ecological positions.