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The Young Indigenous Women's Utopia Group, Cindy Moccasin, Jessica McNab, Catherine Vanner, Sarah Flicker, Jennifer Altenberg, and Kari-Dawn Wuttunee

For the last four years, The Young Indigenous Women's Utopia group (YIWU) has been studying and challenging gendered colonial violence using art, ceremony, and traditional Indigenous ways of knowing ( Kovach 2009 ; Wilson 2008 ). This community

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Brigette Krieg

become active agents in social action ( Wang and Burris 1997 ). Recruitment and Participants Participants learned about the project through recruitment posters and word of mouth. Participants in the study were girls and young, urban Indigenous women

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In Search of Job and Partner

Life Stories of Women in Iakutiia

Lilia Vinokurova and Sardana Boiakova

The article presents an interpretation of the life stories of indigenous women in Iakutiia. Individual biographies of several women are analyzed with the focus on the agency of indigenous women in contemporary Russian reality. The article argues that the economic crisis in Russia and its social consequences are reasons for women to make the choice for action. The contemporary portrait of indigenous women is juxtaposed with the traditional values and image of women that assists in their ability to get through challenges of time and adapt to the demands of the contemporary period.

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Renée Monchalin and Lisa Monchalin

retracing our steps and reconnecting with our cultures and ancestral teachings to restore balance in our communities. This teaching is relevant to our experiences of navigating our way through academia. As proud young Indigenous women in this setting, this

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Passing the Talking Stick

Resilience-Making through Storytelling

Tammy Williams

Young Indigenous Women's Utopia . 2019. Treaty 6 Traditional Homeland of the Metis People (Saskatoon, SK): Self-published with support from York University, McGill University, and Networks for Change and Well-being: Girl-led ‘from the ground up

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Claudia Mitchell

ensuring a place for the article, “Where are all the Girls and Indigenous People at IGSA@ND?” co-authored by the girls who belong to the Young Indigenous Women's Utopia group. Such an account offers a meta-analysis of the field of girlhood studies, but so

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

This issue acknowledges the work of Rosalie Fish (Cowlitz), Jordan Marie Daniels (Lakota), and the many others who refuse to ignore the situation that has allowed thousands of Indigenous women and girls to be murdered or go missing across North America without the full intervention of law enforcement and other local authorities. As Rosalie Fish said in an interview regarding her activism on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG),

"I felt a little heavy at first just wearing the paint. And I think that was . . . like my ancestors letting me know . . . you need to take this seriously: “What you’re doing, you need to do well.” And I think that’s why I felt really heavy when I first put on my paint and when I tried to run with my paint at first. . . . I would say my personal strength comes from my grandmas, my mom, my great grandma, and I really hope that’s true, that I made them proud." (Inland Northwest Native News interview)

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Women’s Rights and Sovereignty/Autonomy

Negotiating Gender in Indigenous Justice Spaces

Shannon Speed, María Teresa Sierra, Lynn Stephen, Jessica Johnson, and Heike Schaumberg

In recent years in both the United States and Latin America, indigenous peoples have taken increasing control over local justice, creating indigenous courts and asserting more autonomy in the administration of justice in their tribes, regions, or communities. New justice spaces, such as the Chickasaw District Courts in Oklahoma and the Zapatista Good Governance Councils in Chiapas, work to resolve conflict based largely on indigenous ‘customs and traditions.’ Many of the cases brought before these local legal bodies are domestic cases that directly involve issues of gender, women’s rights and culture. Yet the relationship between ‘indigenous traditions’ and women’s rights has been a fraught one. This forum article considers how these courts emerged in the context of neoliberalism and whether they provide new venues for indigenous women to pursue their rights and to challenge gendered social norms or practices that they find oppressive.

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Claudia Mitchell

As this issue of Girlhood Studies went to press, two very dramatic moments in the history of girls and young women were in the public eye. One was the large 8000-strong gathering of NGOs, researchers, politicians, and activists from 165 countries at the Women Deliver Global Summit on gender equality that took place in Vancouver, Canada, from 3 to 6 June 2019. There, according the program, the focus was on how power can both hinder and drive progress and change for a world that is more gender equal. On 3 June, the long-awaited report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) in Canada was released, with its 231 recommendations or calls for social justice to address what is now acknowledged as being part of what was (and continues to be) cultural genocide. Both the Global Summit and the report on MMIWG are reminders of the need for the blend of scholarship and activism that is so critical to advancing issues of equity and to implementing recommendations to achieve this. This unthemed issue with its broad range of geographic locations, concerns, and methods and its attention to activism, along with scholarship that features work from both the humanities and social sciences, is key in relation to mobilizing a social justice agenda.

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Speaking Our Truths, Building Our Strengths

Shaping Indigenous Girlhood Studies

Kirsten Lindquist, Kari-dawn Wuttunee, and Sarah Flicker

tân’si and welcome to this Special Section of Girlhood Studies on Indigenous Girls in which we present work written or created by and/or about the lives of young Indigenous women and girls across Turtle Island (as North America is known to many